25 Years IWH

Dr Alexander Kubis

Dr Alexander Kubis
Current Position

since 7/12

Research Affiliate

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

since 3/11

Researcher

Institute for Employment Research (IAB) Nuremberg

Research Interests

  • regional economics
  • labour economics
  • human capital

Dr Alexander Kubis is a researcher at the Institute for Employment Research (IAB), an independent research institute of the German Federal Employment Agency (Bundesagentur für Arbeit).

The IWH will benefit from his expertise in the fields of demography, migration and regional and labour economics, as well as spatial econometrics, especially for research projects that seek determinants of human capital mobility and the spatial interrelatedness of economic activity.

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Dr Alexander Kubis
Dr Alexander Kubis
Mitglied - Department Structural Change and Productivity
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Publications

Identifying Industrial Clusters from a Multidimensional Perspective: Methodical Aspects with an Application to Germany

Matthias Brachert Mirko Titze Alexander Kubis

in: Papers in Regional Science , No. 2, 2011

Abstract

If regional development agencies assume the cluster concept to be an adequate framework to promote regional growth and competitiveness, it is necessary to identify industrial clusters in a comprehensive manner. Previous studies used a diversity of methods to identify the predominant concentrations of economic activity in one industrial sector in a region. This paper is based on a multidimensional approach developed by Titze et al. With the help of the combination of concentration measures and input–output methods they were able to identify horizontal and vertical dimensions of industrial clusters. This paper aims to refine this approach by using a superior measure of spatial concentration and by integrating information about spatial interdependence of industrial cluster structures to contribute to a more adequate framework for industrial cluster identification.

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Analysis of location of large-area shopping centres - A probalistic gravity model for the Halle-Leipzig area

Alexander Kubis Maria Hartmann

in: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft , No. 1, 2007

Abstract

A profund analysis of large-area shopping centres from the perspective of retail, but also of communes is of importance for the choice of site selection. In central Germany, the Halle–Leipzig area represents an example of strong competitiveness between the different participants in retail. The analysis described in this article is based on the MCI Model of Nakanishi and Cooper, which is used to investigate the regional influences of nine large shopping centres in the area of interest. The analysis demonstrates, that the studied shopping centres intensely affect the structure of retail in the region and exert a strong influence on the structural weakness of the surrounding cities due to their relative success in comparison to other retail locations city centres. An important volume of the turnover of the administrative districts flows to the analysed shopping centres. On the other hand, the article describes the influence of a systematic location decision on the reachable turnover potential of the modelized large-area shopping centres among each other. The shopping centres Saale Park (today Nova Eventis) near Leipzig and the Paunsdorf Center in Leipzig show the biggest influence on the competing centres.

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Economic Structure and Regional Performance in Germany, 2002-2007

Alexander Kubis Matthias Brachert Mirko Titze

in: European Planning Studies , No. 2, 2012

Abstract

This paper explores the impact of industrial clusters on regional growth at the German labour market region level using a regional convergence model. Based on the results of an exploratory study of the geography of German industrial clusters, we are able to differentiate the impact of industrial clustering from a horizontal and a vertical perspective while taking regional convergence into consideration. The results indicate that in addition to an all-German process of convergence, a specific East German one can be identified. The different types of industrial clusters show mixed effects within this framework. While vertically isolated industrial clusters have a negative impact on regional growth in this period, positive growth effects can be identified when industrial clusters show an intra-regional vertical interconnectedness.

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Working Papers

Related Variety, Unrelated Variety and Regional Functions: A spatial panel approach

Matthias Brachert Alexander Kubis Mirko Titze

in: Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography , 2013

Abstract

The paper presents estimates for the impact of related variety, unrelated variety and the functions a region performs in the production process on regional employment growth in Germany. We argue that regions benefit from the existence of related activities that facilitate economic development. Thereby the sole reliance of the related and unrelated variety concept on standard industrial classifications (SIC) remains debatable. We offer estimations for establishing that conceptual progress can be made when the focus of analysis goes beyond solely considering industries. We develop an industry-function based approach of related and unrelated variety and test our hypothesis by the help of spatial panel approach. Our findings suggest that related variety as same as unrelated variety facilitate regional employment growth in Germany. However, the drivers behind these effects do differ. While the positive effect of related variety is driven by high degrees of relatedness in the regional “R&D” and “White-Collar”-functions, the effects of unrelated variety are spurred by “Blue Collar”-functions in this period.

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Human Capital Mobility and Convergence – A Spatial Dynamic Panel Model of the German Regions

Alexander Kubis Lutz Schneider

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 9, 2012

Abstract

Since the fall of the iron curtain in 1989, the migration deficit of the Eastern part of Germany has accumulated to 1.8 million people, which is over ten percent of its initial population. Depending on their human capital endowment, these migrants might either – in the case of low-skilled migration – accelerate or – in high-skilled case – impede convergence. Due to the availability of detailed data on regional human capital, migration and productivity growth, we are able to test how geographic mobility affects convergence via the human capital selectivity of migration. With regard to the endogeneity of the migration flows and human capital, we apply a dynamic panel data model within the framework of β-convergence and account for spatial dependence. The regressions indicate a positive, robust, but modest effect of a migration surplus on regional productivity growth. After controlling for human capital, the effect of migration decreases; this decrease indicates that skill selectivity is one way that migration impacts growth.

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Human Capital Mobility and Convergence. A Spatial Dynamic Panel Model of the German Regions

Alexander Kubis Lutz Schneider

in: IAB-Discussion Paper 23/2012 , 2012

Abstract

Since the fall of the iron curtain in 1989, the migration deficit of the Eastern part of Germany has accumulated to 1.8 million people, which is over 10 percent of its ini-tial population. Depending on their human capital endowment, these migrants might either – in the case of low-skilled migration – accelerate or – in high-skilled case– impede convergence. Due to the availability of detailed data on regional human capital, migration and productivity growth, we are able to test how geographic mobil-ity affects convergence via the human capital selectivity of migration. With regard to the endogeneity of the migration flows and human capital, we apply a dynamic panel data model within the framework of β-convergence and account for spatial depend-ence. The regressions indicate a positive, robust, but modest effect of a migration surplus on regional productivity growth. After controlling for human capital, the effect of migration decreases; this decrease indicates that skill selectivity is one way that migration impacts growth.

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