25 Years IWH

Eva Hank

Eva Hank
Current Position

since 4/15

Economist in the Department of Structural Change and Productivity

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

Research Interests

  • applied econometrics
  • empirical labour economics

Eva Hank is a PhD candidate in the Department of Structural Change and Productivity since April 2015. In her current research, she examines the effects of job displacement on affected employees.

Eva Hank studied Political Science (BA) at the Otto Friedrich University Bamberg and Economics (MSc) with a focus on International Economics and Policy Consulting at the Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg. She wrote her master thesis in cooperation with the IWH and investigated differences between East and West Germans concerning their behaviour and preferences as well as potential convergence processes since the Fall of the Iron Curtain.

Your contact

Eva Hank
Eva Hank
Mitglied - Department Structural Change and Productivity
Send Message +49 345 7753-790

Publications

Working Papers

cover_DP_2016-28.jpg

Who Buffers Income Losses After Job Displacement? The Role of Alternative Income Sources, the Family, and the State

Daniel Fackler Eva Hank

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 28, 2016

Abstract

Using survey data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), this paper analyses to what extent alternative income sources, reactions within the household context, and redistribution by the state attenuate earnings losses after job displacement. Applying propensity score matching and fixed effects estimations, we find high individual earnings losses after job displacement and only limited convergence. Income from selfemployment slightly reduces the earnings gap and severance payments buffer losses in the short run. On the household level, we find substantial and rather persistent losses in per capita labour income. We do not find that increased labour supply by other household members contributes to the compensation of the income losses. Most importantly, our results show that redistribution within the tax and transfer system substantially mitigates income losses of displaced workers both in the short and the long run whereas other channels contribute only little.

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