25 Years IWH

Dr Matthias Brachert

Dr Matthias Brachert
Current Position

since 11/07

Economist in the Department of Structural Change and Productivity

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

Research Interests

  • cluster genesis of the photovoltaic industry in Eastern Germany
  • regional development
  • economic convergence

Dr Matthias Brachert is a member of the reserach groups "The Performance of Firms and Regions: Determinants and the Evaluation of Industrial Policy" and "The Impact of Institutions and Social Norms on Preferences and Behavior" at IWH.

He studied economics at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and at Université de La Réunion, France and joined IWH in 2007. He received his doctor's degree under Ron Boschma at Utrecht University.

Your contact

Dr Matthias Brachert
Dr Matthias Brachert
Mitglied - Department Structural Change and Productivity
Send Message +49 345 7753-870

Publications

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Joint R&D Subsidies, Related Variety, and Regional Innovation

T. Broekel Matthias Brachert M. Duschl T. Brenner

in: International Regional Science Review , forthcoming

Abstract

Subsidies for research and development (R&D) are an important tool of public R&D policy, which motivates extensive scientific analyses and evaluations. This article adds to this literature by arguing that the effects of R&D subsidies go beyond the extension of organizations’ monetary resources invested into R&D. It is argued that collaboration induced by subsidized joint R&D projects yield significant effects that are missed in traditional analyses. An empirical study on the level of German labor market regions substantiates this claim, showing that collaborative R&D subsidies impact regions’ innovation growth when providing access to related variety and embedding regions into central positions in cross-regional knowledge networks.

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Guest Editorial: Which Regions Benefit from Emerging Industries? Guest Editorial

Matthias Brachert U. Cantner H. Graf Jutta Günther Michael Schwartz

in: European Planning Studies , No. 11, 2013

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Identifying Industrial Clusters from a Multidimensional Perspective: Methodical Aspects with an Application to Germany

Matthias Brachert Mirko Titze Alexander Kubis

in: Papers in Regional Science , No. 2, 2011

Abstract

If regional development agencies assume the cluster concept to be an adequate framework to promote regional growth and competitiveness, it is necessary to identify industrial clusters in a comprehensive manner. Previous studies used a diversity of methods to identify the predominant concentrations of economic activity in one industrial sector in a region. This paper is based on a multidimensional approach developed by Titze et al. With the help of the combination of concentration measures and input–output methods they were able to identify horizontal and vertical dimensions of industrial clusters. This paper aims to refine this approach by using a superior measure of spatial concentration and by integrating information about spatial interdependence of industrial cluster structures to contribute to a more adequate framework for industrial cluster identification.

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Working Papers

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On the Stability of Preferences: Repercussions of Entrepreneurship on Risk Attitudes

Matthias Brachert Walter Hyll

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 5, 2014

Abstract

The majority of empirical studies make use of the assumption of stable preferences in searching for a relationship between risk attitude and the decision to become and stay an entrepreneur. Yet empirical evidence on this relationship is limited. In this paper, we show that entry into entrepreneurship itself plays a decisive role in shaping risk preferences. We find that becoming self-employed is indeed associated with a relative increase in risk attitudes, an increase that is quantitatively large and significant even after controlling for individual characteristics, different employment status, and duration of entrepreneurship. The findings suggest that studies assuming that risk attitudes are stable over time suffer from reverse causality; risk attitudes do not remain stable over time, and individual preferences change endogenously.

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The Structure and Evolution of Intersectoral Technological Complementarity in R&D in Germany from 1990 to 2011

Matthias Brachert T. Broekel

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 13, 2014

Abstract

Technological complementarity is argued to be a crucial element for effective Research and Development (R&D) collaboration. The real structure is, however, still largely unknown. Based on the argument that organizations’ knowledge resources must fit for enabling collective learning and innovation, we use the co-occurrence of firms in collaborative R&D projects in Germany to assess inter-sectoral technological complementarity between 129 sectors. The results are mapped as complementarity space for the Germany economy. The space and its dynamics from 1990 to 2011 are analyzed by means of social network analysis. The results illustrate sectors being complements both from a dyadic and portfolio/ network perspective. This latter is important, as complementarities may only become fully effective when integrated in a complete set of different knowledge resources from multiple sectors. The dynamic perspective moreover reveals the shifting demand for knowledge resources among sectors at different time periods.

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Identifying the Effects of Place-based Policies – Causal Evidence from Germany

Eva Dettmann Matthias Brachert Mirko Titze

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 18, 2016

Abstract

The German government provides discretionary investment grants to structurally weak regions to reduce regional disparities. We use a regression discontinuity design that exploits an exogenous discrete jump in the probability of receiving investment grants to identify the causal effects of the investment grant on regional outcomes. We find positive effects for regional gross value-added and productivity growth, but no effects for employment and gross wage growth.

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