25 Years IWH

Professor Dr Michael Fritsch

Professor Dr Michael Fritsch
Current Position

since 2/12

Research Professor

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association Friedrich

since 2006

Full Professor of Economics

Friedrich Schiller University Jena

Research Interests

  • Innovation
  • Economic growth an economic development
  • economic dynamics

Professor Michael Fritsch is a distinguished expert in the effects of market dynamics and innovation activity on economic development. With regard to market dynamics, his main interest is entrepreneurship, particularly the start-up of new businesses, their success and failure, and their impact on the evolution of their respective industries and regions.

On this website, publications resulting from cooperation with the IWH are listed. A complete list of publications is available on the author's website.

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Professor Dr Michael Fritsch
Professor Dr Michael Fritsch
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Publications

Determinants of the Efficiency of Regional Innovation Systems

Michael Fritsch Viktor Slavtchev

in: Regional Studies , No. 7, 2011

Abstract

Determinants of the efficiency of regional innovation systems, Regional Studies. This paper analyses differences in the efficiency of regional innovation systems. Alternative measures for the efficiency of regional innovation systems based on the concept of a knowledge production function are discussed. The empirical findings suggest that spillovers from within the private sector as well as from universities and other public research institutions have a positive effect on the efficiency of private sector research and development. It is particularly the intensity of interactions between private and public sector research and development that increases the efficiency. It is found that regions dominated by large establishments tend to be less efficient than regions with a lower average establishment size.

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How does Industry Specialization Affect the Efficiency of Regional Innovation Systems?

Michael Fritsch Viktor Slavtchev

in: The Annals of Regional Science , No. 1, 2010

Abstract

This study analyzes the relationship between the specialization of a region in certain industries and the efficiency of the region in generating new knowledge. The efficiency measure is constructed by relating regional R&D input and output. An inversely u-shaped relationship is found between regional specialization and R&D efficiency, indicating the presence of externalities of both Marshall and Jacobs’ type. Further factors influencing efficiency are externalities resulting from high R&D intensity of the local private sector as well as knowledge from local public research institutions. The impact of both the specialization and the additional factors is, however, different for regions at different efficiency levels.

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Universities and Innovation in Space

Michael Fritsch Viktor Slavtchev

in: Industry and Innovation , No. 2, 2007

Abstract

We investigate the role of universities as a knowledge source for regional innovation processes. The contribution of universities is tested on the level of German NUTS‐3 regions (Kreise) by using a variety of indicators. We find that the intensity and quality of the research conducted by the universities have a significant effect on regional innovative output while pure size is unimportant. Therefore, a policy that wants to promote regional innovation processes by building up universities should place substantial emphasis on the intensity and quality of the research conducted there. We also find the effects of universities to be concentrated in space. Obviously, the geographical proximity to particular knowledge sources is important for regional innovative activities.

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Working Papers

How Does Industry Specialization Affect the Efficiency of Regional Innovation Systems?

Michael Fritsch Viktor Slavtchev

in: Jena Economic Research Papers, Nr. 2008-058 , No. 58, 2008

Abstract

This study analyzes the relationship between the specialization of a region in certain industries and the efficiency of the region in generating new knowledge. The efficiency measure is constructed by relating regional R&D input and output. An inversely u-shaped relationship is found between regional specialization and R&D efficiency, indicating the presence of externalities of both Marshall and Jacobs’ type. Further factors influencing efficiency are spillovers within the private sector as well as from public research institutions. The impact of both the specialization and the additional factors is, however, different for regions at different efficiency levels.

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Universities as Driver of Regional Innovation?

Michael Fritsch Viktor Slavtchev N. Steigenberger

in: Arbeitspapier / Hans-Böckler-Stiftung, Nr. 158 , 2008

Abstract

Innovation ist der wesentliche Motor wirtschaftlicher Entwicklung. Denn vor allem die Andersverwendung von Ressourcen, weniger deren Mehreinsatz führt zu Wachstum und Wohlstand. Aus diesem Grund stellt Innovation auch einen wichtigen Ansatzpunkt für eine auf Wachstum zielende Politik dar. Dies gilt sowohl auf gesamtwirtschaftlicher Ebene als auch für einzelne Branchen und Regionen. In Innovationsprozessen stellt Wissen die entscheidende Ressource dar. Wissen ist mehr als bloße Information. Es umfasst insbesondere auch die Fähigkeit, Informationen zu interpretieren und anzuwenden bzw. ihre Anwendbarkeit einzuschätzen. Wissen ist an Menschen gebunden und lässt sich vielfach nur in direktem persönlichen Kontakt weitergeben. Aus diesem Grund hat Wissen eine regionale Dimension: Die Verfügbarkeit von Wissen hängt davon ab, wo sich die Menschen aufhalten, die über dieses Wissen verfügen. Dies ist ein wesentlicher Grund dafür, dass die Fähigkeit zur Innovation von Region zu Region wesentliche Unterschiede aufweisen kann. Für eine Politik, die auf die Stärkung der Innovationsfähigkeit von Regionen gerichtet ist, kommt den öffentlichen Forschungseinrichtungen – Universitäten, Fachhochschulen und außeruniversitären Forschungsinstituten – aus mindestens zwei Gründen zentrale Bedeutung zu: Erstens verfügen die öffentlichen Forschungseinrichtungen in besonderem Maße über innovationsrelevantes Wissen. Ihre Kernaufgabe ist es, Wissen zu produzieren, zu sammeln und weiterzugeben. Zweitens ist der Bereich der öffentlichen Forschungseinrichtungen – im Gegensatz zur privaten Wirtschaft – von der Politik direkt gestaltbar. Aus diesen Gründen stellt die Steuerung des Hochschulsektors ein zentrales Handlungsfeld der Innovationspolitik dar.

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What Determines the Innovative Success of Subsidized Collaborative R&D Projects? – Project-Level Evidence from Germany –

Michael Schwartz François Peglow Michael Fritsch Jutta Günther

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 7, 2010

Abstract

Systemic innovation theory emphasizes that innovations are the result of an interdependent exchange process between different organizations. This is reflected in the current paradigm in European innovation policy, which aims at the support of collaborative R&D and innovation projects bringing together science and industry. Building on a large data set using project-level evidence on 406 subsidized R&D cooperation projects, the present paper provides detailed insights on the relationship between the innovative success of R&D cooperation projects and project characteristics. Patent applications and publications are used as measures for direct outcomes of R&D projects. We also differentiate between academic-industry projects and pure inter-firm projects. Main results of negative binomial regressions are that large-firm involvement is positively related to pa-tent applications, but not to publications. Conversely, university involvement has positive effects on project outcomes in terms of publications but not in terms of patent applications. In general, projects’ funding is an important predictor of innovative success of R&D cooperation projects. No significant results are found for spatial proximity among cooperation partners and for the engagement of an applied research institute. Results are discussed with respect to the design of R&D cooperation support schemes.

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