25 Years IWH

Professor Dr Steffen Müller

Professor Dr Steffen Müller
Current Position

since 10/14

Head of the Department of Structural Change and Productivity

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

since 10/14

Professor in Economics: Productivity and Innovations

Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg

Research Interests

  • applied econometrics
  • empirical labour economics
  • firm entry and exit dynamics

Since October 2014, Steffen Mueller is professor at the University of Magdeburg and head of the Department of Structural Change and Productivity at the Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH). He is member of the standing committees for education economics, population economics, and social policy of the German Economic Association.

Steffen Müller studied economics at the University of Leipzig. At the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, he worked as a research assistant for Professor Riphahn from 2005 till 2014 and received his doctoral degree in Economics in November 2009. During his PhD studies, Steffen Müller stayed for several months at the University of California in Davis. Following an invitation by David Card, he visited the University of California in Berkeley from September to December 2012. He finished his habilitation in June 2014.

Your contact

Professor Dr Steffen Müller
Professor Dr Steffen Müller
Leiter - Department Structural Change and Productivity
Send Message +49 345 7753-708

Publications

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Why is there resistance to works councils?

Steffen Müller Jens Stegmaier

in: Economic and Industrial Democracy , forthcoming

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Kosten und Nutzen der Ausbildung an Tertiärbildungsinstitutionen im Vergleich

Martina Eschelbach G. Heineck Steffen Müller Regina T. Riphahn

in: Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik , No. 2, 2010

Abstract

We compare German institutions of tertiary education (universities and polytechnics) with respect to the cost of and the returns to their educational degrees. Based on cost data from two different sources we find that on average the expenditures of universities are lower than those of polytechnics when we consider expenditures per potential enrollee and per student enrolled during the regular education period. We apply data from the German Socio-economic Panel (2001–2007) to estimate the private returns to tertiary education and find higher returns to university than polytechnic training. These results are robust to a variety of alternative procedures.

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Firm Leadership and the Gender Pay Gap: Do Active Owners Discriminate more than Hired Managers?

Boris Hirsch Steffen Müller

in: Journal for Labour Market Research , No. 1, 2014

Abstract

Using a large linked employer–employee data set for Germany, we investigate differences in the unexplained gender pay gap between owner-run and manager-run firms. We hypothesise that owner-managers and hired managers differ in their discretion to engage in profit-reducing taste discrimination against women, which would translate into different pay gaps depending on leadership regime. We find that unexplained gaps are significantly higher in owner-run firms, both statistically and economically. Yet, scrutinising these results by restricting our analysis to firms that only differ in leadership regime, this substantial difference disappears. Therefore, our findings do not support that active owners are more discriminatory per se.

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Working Papers

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Plant-level Employment Development before Collective Displacements: Comparing Mass Layoffs, Plant Closures, and Bankruptcies

Daniel Fackler Steffen Müller Jens Stegmaier

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 27, 2016

Abstract

To assess to what extent collective job displacements can be regarded as unanticipated exogenous shocks for affected employees, we analyze plant-level employment patterns before bankruptcy, plant closure without bankruptcy, and mass layoff. Utilizing administrative data covering all West German private sector plants, we find no systematic employment reductions prior to mass layoffs, a strong and long-lasting reduction prior to closures, and a much shorter shadow of death preceding bankruptcy. Our analysis of worker flows underlines that bankruptcies seem to struggle for survival while closures follow a shrinking strategy. We conclude that the scope of worker anticipation of upcoming job loss is smallest for mass layoffs and largest for closures without bankruptcy.

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Paternal Unemployment During Childhood: Causal Effects on Youth Worklessness and Educational Attainment

Steffen Müller Regina T. Riphahn Caroline Schwientek

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 8, 2016

Abstract

Using long-running data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (1984-2012), we investigate the impact of paternal unemployment on child labor market and education outcomes. We first describe correlation patterns and then use sibling fixed effects and the Gottschalk (1996) method to identify the causal effects of paternal unemployment. We find different patterns for sons and daughters. Paternal unemployment does not seem to causally affect the outcomes of sons. In contrast, it increases both daughters‘ worklessness and educational attainment. We test the robustness of the results and explore potential explanations.

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Size of Training Firms and Cumulated Long-run Unemployment Exposure – The Role of Firms, Luck, and Ability in Young Workers’ Careers

Steffen Müller Renate Neubäumer

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 5, 2016

Abstract

This paper analyzes how life-cycle unemployment of former apprentices depends on the size of the training firm. We start from the hypotheses that the size of training firms reduces long-run cumulated unemployment exposure, e.g. via differences in training quality and in the availability of internal labor markets, and that the access to large training firms depends positively on young workers’ ability and their luck to live in a region with many large and medium-sized training firms. We test these hypotheses empirically by using a large administrative data set for Germany and find corroborative evidence.

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