25 Years IWH

IT Services

The department of information and communication technology is responsible for the provision of central IT services. Firstly, these include basic services as prerequisite for a secure and reliable IT infrastructure: Security and access concepts, data provision and backup, disaster management/real-time monitoring, design and development of active and passive network infrastructure, virtualization technologies/server and data consolidation as well as implementation, migration and administration of operating systems and server-side services.

In addition, there are specific services primarily supporting the scientific workflow: Provision of special applications and high-performance computing systems, development of database and web applications and remote access.

These activities are accompanied by administrative processes like: Design and development of the entire IT infrastructure, medium- and long-term investment planning, coordination with the IWH management, documentation, work planning and controlling as well as communication with manufacturers, system houses, and partner institutions.

Your contact

Jan Neumann
Jan Neumann
Leiter - Department IT Services
Send Message +49 345 7753-856

Refereed Publications

cover_the-economic-journal.jpg

The Political Economy of Financial Systems: Evidence from Suffrage Reforms in the Last Two Centuries

Hans Degryse Thomas Lambert Armin Schwienbacher

in: The Economic Journal , forthcoming

Abstract

Voting rights were initially limited to wealthy elites providing political support for stock markets. The franchise expansion induces the median voter to provide political support for banking development, as this new electorate has lower financial holdings and benefits less from the riskiness and financial returns from stock markets. Our panel data evidence covering the years 1830–1999 shows that tighter restrictions on the voting franchise induce greater stock market development, whereas a broader voting franchise is more conducive to the banking sector, consistent with Perotti and von Thadden (2006). The results are robust to controlling for other institutional arrangements and endogeneity.

read publication

cover_review-of-economic-dynamics.jpeg

Complex-task Biased Technological Change and the Labor Market

Colin Caines Florian Hoffmann Gueorgui Kambourov

in: Review of Economic Dynamics , 2017

Abstract

In this paper we study the relationship between task complexity and the occupational wage- and employment structure. Complex tasks are defined as those requiring higher-order skills, such as the ability to abstract, solve problems, make decisions, or communicate effectively. We measure the task complexity of an occupation by performing Principal Component Analysis on a broad set of occupational descriptors in the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) data. We establish four main empirical facts for the U.S. over the 1980–2005 time period that are robust to the inclusion of a detailed set of controls, subsamples, and levels of aggregation: (1) There is a positive relationship across occupations between task complexity and wages and wage growth; (2) Conditional on task complexity, routine-intensity of an occupation is not a significant predictor of wage growth and wage levels; (3) Labor has reallocated from less complex to more complex occupations over time; (4) Within groups of occupations with similar task complexity labor has reallocated to non-routine occupations over time. We then formulate a model of Complex-Task Biased Technological Change with heterogeneous skills and show analytically that it can rationalize these facts. We conclude that workers in non-routine occupations with low ability of solving complex tasks are not shielded from the labor market effects of automatization.

read publication

cover_journal-of-international-money-and-finance.png

Central Bank Transparency and Cross-border Banking

Stefan Eichler Helge Littke Lena Tonzer

in: Journal of International Money and Finance , No. 6, 2017

Abstract

We analyze the effect of central bank transparency on cross-border bank activities. Based on a panel gravity model for cross-border bank claims for 21 home and 47 destination countries from 1998 to 2010, we find strong empirical evidence that a rise in central bank transparency in the destination country, on average, increases cross-border claims. Using interaction models, we find that the positive effect of central bank transparency on cross-border claims is only significant if the central bank is politically independent and operates in a stable economic environment. Central bank transparency and credibility are thus considered complements by banks investing abroad.

read publication

cover_journal-of-international-money-and-finance.png

The Political Determinants of Government Bond Holdings

Stefan Eichler T. Plaga

in: Journal of International Money and Finance , No. 5, 2017

Abstract

This paper analyzes the link between political factors and sovereign bond holdings of US investors in 60 countries over the 2003–2013 period. We find that, in general, US investors hold more bonds in countries with few political constraints on the government. Moreover, US investors respond to increased uncertainty around major elections by reducing government bond holdings. These effects are particularly significant in democratic regimes and countries with sound institutions, which enable effective implementation of fiscal consolidation measures or economic reforms. In countries characterized by high current default risk or a sovereign default history, US investors show a tendency towards favoring higher political constraints as this makes sovereign default more difficult for the government. Political instability, characterized by the fluctuation in political veto players, reduces US investment in government bonds. This effect is more pronounced in countries with low sovereign solvency.

read publication
Mitglied der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft LogoTotal-Equality-LogoWeltoffen Logo