25 Jahre IWH

Professor Dr. Claus Schnabel

Professor Dr. Claus Schnabel
Aktuelle Position

seit 3/15

Forschungsprofessor

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 4/00

Professor für Volkswirtschaftslehre, insb. Arbeitsmarkt- und Regionalpolitik

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Arbeitsmarktökonomik
  • Arbeitsbeziehungen
  • Wirtschaftspolitik

Claus Schnabel arbeitet mit dem IWH besonders in Fragen der Gründung und Schließung von Betrieben sowie von Entlohnung und Arbeitsbeziehungen zusammen. Er ist Professor für Volkswirtschaftslehre, insbesondere Arbeitsmarkt- und Regionalpolitik, an der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. Seine Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen auf den Gebieten der empirischen Arbeitsmarktökonomik, der Arbeitsbeziehungen und der Wirtschaftspolitik.

Auf dieser Webseite sind im Rahmen der Kooperation mit dem IWH entstandene Veröffentlichungen gelistet. Eine vollständige Publikationsliste ist auf der Homepage des Autors abrufbar.

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Professor Dr. Claus Schnabel
Professor Dr. Claus Schnabel
Mitglied - Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität
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Publikationen

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Betriebsräte und andere Formen der betrieblichen Mitarbeitervertretung – Substitute oder Komplemente

Stefan Ertelt Boris Hirsch Claus Schnabel

in: Industrielle Beziehungen , im Erscheinen

Publikation lesen

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Coming to Work While Sick: An Economic Theory of Presenteeism With an Application to German Data

Boris Hirsch Daniel S. J. Lechmann Claus Schnabel

in: Oxford Economic Papers , im Erscheinen

Abstract

Presenteeism, i.e. attending work while sick, is widespread and associated with significant costs. Still, economic analyses of this phenomenon are rare. In a theoretical model, we show that presenteeism arises due to differences between workers in (healthrelated) disutility from workplace attendance. As these differences are unobservable by employers, they set wages that incentivise sick workers to attend work. Using a large representative German data set, we test several hypotheses derived from our model. In line with our predictions, we find that bad health status and stressful working conditions are positively related to presenteeism. Better dismissal protection, captured by higher tenure, is associated with slightly fewer presenteeism days, whereas the role of productivity and skills is inconclusive.

Publikation lesen

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Do Employers Have More Monopsony Power in Slack Labor Markets?

Boris Hirsch Elke J. Jahn Claus Schnabel

in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review , im Erscheinen

Abstract

This article confronts monopsony theory’s predictions regarding workers’ wages with observed wage patterns over the business cycle. Using German administrative data for the years 1985 to 2010 and an estimation framework based on duration models, the authors construct a time series of the labor supply elasticity to the firm and estimate its relationship to the unemployment rate. They find that firms possess more monopsony power during economic downturns. Half of this cyclicality stems from workers’ job separations being less wage driven when unemployment rises, and the other half mirrors that firms find it relatively easier to poach workers. Results show that the cyclicality is more pronounced in tight labor markets with low unemployment, and that the findings are robust to controlling for time-invariant unobserved worker or plant heterogeneity. The authors further document that cyclical changes in workers’ entry wages are of similar magnitude as those predicted under pure monopsonistic wage setting.

Publikation lesen

Arbeitspapiere

Survival of Spinoffs and Other Startups: First Evidence for the Private Sector in Germany, 1976-2008

Daniel Fackler Claus Schnabel

in: IZA Discussion Paper Series, No. 7542 , Nr. 7542, 2013

Abstract

Using a 50 percent sample of all establishments in the German private sector, we report that spinoffs are larger and initially employ more skilled and more experienced workers than other startups. Controlling for these and other differences, we find that spinoffs are less likely to exit than other startups. We show that in West and East Germany and in all sectors investigated pulled spinoffs (where the parent company continues after they are founded) generally have the lowest exit hazards, followed by pushed spinoffs (where the parent company stops operations). The difference between both types of spinoffs is particularly pronounced in the first three years. Contrary to expectations, intra-industry spinoffs are not found to have lower exit hazards in our sample.

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