25 Jahre IWH

Professor Dr. Lutz Schneider

Professor Dr. Lutz Schneider
Aktuelle Position

seit 4/13

Forschungsprofessor

Leibniz-Insitut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 2013

Professor für Volkswirtschaftslehre

Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaften Coburg

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • angewandte Mikroökonometrie
  • Verhaltensökonomik

Lutz Schneider beteiligt sich an den laufenden Arbeiten der IWH-Forschungsgruppe Der Einfluss von Institutionen und sozialen Normen auf Präferenzen und Verhalten. Er ist Professor für Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaften Coburg. Bis zum Jahr 2012 war er PostDoc am IWH. Seine Forschungsinteressen liegen auf den Gebieten Demographie, Humankapital, Migration, Regionalökonomik und Mikroökonometrie.

Auf dieser Webseite sind im Rahmen der Kooperation mit dem IWH entstandene Veröffentlichungen gelistet. Eine vollständige Publikationsliste ist auf der Homepage des Autors abrufbar.

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Professor Dr. Lutz Schneider
Professor Dr. Lutz Schneider
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Publikationen

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Relative Deprivation and Migration Preferences

Walter Hyll Lutz Schneider

in: Economics Letters , Nr. 2, 2014

Abstract

In this letter, we overcome the existing shortages with respect to the assignment of individuals to reference groups and are the first to show that individual aversion to relative deprivation plays a decisive role in shaping migration preferences.

Publikation lesen

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The Social Capital Legacy of Communism-results from the Berlin Wall Experiment

Peter Bönisch Lutz Schneider

in: European Journal of Political Economy , Nr. 32, 2013

Abstract

In this paper we establish a direct link between the communist history, the resulting structure of social capital, and attitudes toward spatial mobility. We argue that the communist regime induced a specific social capital mix that discouraged geographic mobility even after its demise. Theoretically, we integrate two branches of the social capital literature into one more comprehensive framework distinguishing an open type and a closed type of social capital. Using the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) we take advantage of the natural experiment that separated Germany into two parts after the WWII to identify the causal effect of social capital on mobility. We estimate a three equation ordered probit model and provide strong empirical evidence for our theoretical propositions.

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A Note on Income Aspirations, Television and Happiness

Lutz Schneider

in: Kyklos , Nr. 2, 2013

Abstract

In their innovative and frequently cited study on the impact watching television (TV) has on income aspirations and happiness, Luigino Bruni and Luca Stanca 2006, henceforth B&S) offer an alternative explanation of Easterlin's income-happiness paradox: “television viewing in contemporary society, by raising material aspirations, contributes to offset the effect of higher income on individual happiness” (B&S, p. 225). More generally, the paper contributes to the literature of economic psychology, addressing the determinants and formation of preferences. While the theoretical analysis of B&S and the hypothesis on the effect of TV on material aspirations are well-grounded, the empirical evidence they present to corroborate the TV hypothesis is rather weak. After correcting a technical inaccuracy of B&S' empirical analysis one obtains results which no longer confirm a significant, positive and robust impact of TV consumption on material aspirations. As discussed in the third section, the revised empirical result does not disprove B&S' main hypothesis on the role of TV in shaping individual preferences. However, it suggests applying a more direct approach of measuring the effect of TV on aspiration than that performed in B&S's empirical analysis.

Publikation lesen

Arbeitspapiere

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Social Distress and Economic Integration

Walter Hyll Lutz Schneider

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 21, 2016

Abstract

We analyze whether social distress from income comparisons affects attitudes towards the integration of economies. Using Germany’s division as natural experiment, we find that East Germans’ feelings of relative deprivation with respect to better-off West Germans led to significantly more support for the upcoming German re-unification.

Publikation lesen

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Social Comparisons and Attitudes towards Foreigners. Evidence from the ‘Fall of the Iron Curtain’

Walter Hyll Lutz Schneider

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 12, 2016

Abstract

We exploit the natural experiment of German re-unification to address the question whether distress from social (income) comparisons results in negative attitudes towards foreigners. Our empirical approach rests upon East German individuals who have West German peers. We use the exogenous variation of wealth of West German peers shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall as an instrument to identify the effect of distress from social comparisons on East Germans’ attitudes. We find robust evidence that East Germans expose strong negative attitudes towards foreigners, particularly from low-wage countries, if they worry about their economic status compared to better-off peers.

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Social Capital and Migration Preferences - An Empirical Analysis for the Case of the Reunified Germany

Peter Bönisch Lutz Schneider Walter Hyll

in: Grincoh Working Papers July 2013 , 2013

Abstract

We focus on the relevance of different types of social capital on migration intentions in the context of shrinking regions. On the one hand, formal social capital characterised by weak ties without local roots is supposed to drive selectivity and outmigration. On the other hand, informal social capital stressing strong ties to friends, relatives or neighbours might hinder migration. In our regression results we do not find an effect of shrinking regions on mobility intentions. Thus, living in a shrinking area is by itself not a reason to move away or to invest less in social capital. However, if an individual considers to move away she reduces her participation in informal and formal networks. Individuals characterised by strong informal ties, i.e. strong relationships to friends, rel atives or neighbours show a significantly lower probability of moving away. And, more qualified types of social capital as participation in local politics or initiatives seem to encourage spatial mobility.

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