25 Jahre IWH

Professor Dr. Martin T. W. Rosenfeld

Professor Dr. Martin T. W. Rosenfeld
Aktuelle Position

seit 1/08

APL-Professor an der Juristischen und Wirtschaftswissenschaftlichen Fakultät

Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

seit 1/98

Leiter Forschungsfeld Stadtökonomik

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Stadtentwicklung und Stadtentwicklungspolitik
  • Regionalpolitik und kommunale Wirtschaftsförderung
  • kommunale Wirtschaftstätigkeit/Daseinsvorsorge
  • kommunale Verwaltungsreform
  • interkommunale Kooperation
  • kommunale Steuer- und Finanzpolitik
  • Föderalismusökonomik/Fiscal Federalism

Martin T. W. Rosenfeld ist seit 1998 am IWH tätig. Derzeit leitet er das Forschungsfeld Stadtökonomik und hat eine apl. Professur an der Juristischen und Wirtschaftswissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg.

Er ist Mitglied im Direktorium der Interdisziplinären Wissenschaftlichen Einheit Genossenschafts- und Kooperationsforschung (IWE GK) an der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, seit 2013 Leiter der Arbeitsgruppe „Chancen und Bedingungen der Kooperation im Rahmen der Metropolregion Mitteldeutschland“ der Landesarbeitsgemeinschaft (LAG) Sachsen/Sachsen-Anhalt/Thüringen in der Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung (ARL) - Leibniz-Forum für Raumwissenschaften und seit 2014 Mitglied im Beirat des Kompetenzzentrums Stadtumbau des Landes Sachsen-Anhalt. Martin T. W. Rosenfeld promovierte und habilitierte an der Universität Hamburg.

Ihr Kontakt

Professor Dr. Martin T. W. Rosenfeld
Professor Dr. Martin T. W. Rosenfeld
Leiter - Abteilung Forschungsfeld Stadtökonomik
Nachricht senden +49 345 7753-750

Publikationen

Does Administrative Status Matter for Urban Growth? – Evidence from Present and Former County Capitals in East Germany

Bastian Heider Martin T. W. Rosenfeld Albrecht Kauffmann

in: Growth and Change , im Erscheinen

Abstract

Public sector activities are often neglected in the economic approaches used to analyze the driving forces behind urban growth. The institutional status of a regional capital is a crucial aspect of public sector activities. This paper reports on a quasi-natural experiment on county towns in East Germany. Since 1990, cities in East Germany have demonstrated remarkable differences in population development. During this same period, many towns have lost their status as a county seat due to several administrative reforms. Using a difference-in-difference approach, the annual population development of former county capitals is compared to population change in towns that have successfully held on to their capital status throughout the observed period. The estimations show that maintaining county capital status has a statistically significant positive effect on annual changes in population. This effect is furthermore increasing over time after the implementation of the respective reforms.

Publikation lesen

Kommunale Aufgabendezentralisierung und bezirkliches Finanzsystem

Gunther Engelhardt Frank Nullmeier Martin T. W. Rosenfeld

in: Archiv für Kommunalwissenschaften (AfK) , 1983

Publikation lesen

The Reform of Local Public Services of General Interest in Europe

Peter Haug Martin T. W. Rosenfeld

in: Applied Economics Quarterly (Supplement) , 2004

Abstract

The benefits of a reduced supply of local public services may more than outweigh the supposed welfare losses. This was suggested by various theoretical and empirical investigations in many fields of economics during the last decades. Nevertheless, local and national politicians, trade unionists, charities, and other lobbyists have succeeded in preventing further liberalisation of “services of general interest” in Europe. This article examines why these preserve agents have been and are still successful. The analysis is based on an institutional economic approach. Several policy measures and institutional changes are suggested to either reduce influence of preserve agents or to compensate them for their losses.

Publikation lesen

Arbeitspapiere

cover_DP_2016-24.jpg

Does Administrative Status Matter for Urban Growth? Evidence from Present and Former County Capitals in East Germany

Bastian Heider Albrecht Kauffmann Martin T. W. Rosenfeld

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 24, 2016

Abstract

Public sector activities are often neglected in the economic approaches used to analyze the driving forces behind urban growth. The institutional status of a regional capital is a crucial aspect of public sector activities. This paper reports on a quasi-natural experiment on county towns in East Germany. Since 1990, cities in East Germany have demonstrated remarkable differences in population development. During this same period, many towns have lost their status as a county seat due to several administrative reforms. Using a difference-in-difference approach, the annual population development of former county capitals is compared to population change in towns that have successfully held on to their capital status throughout the observed period. The estimations show that maintaining county capital status has a statistically significant positive effect on annual changes in population. This effect is furthermore increasing over time after the implementation of the respective reforms.

Publikation lesen

Cover_IWH-Discussion-Papers_2016.jpg

Sharing Competences: The Impact of Local Institutional Settings on Voter Turnout

Claus Michelsen Peter Bönisch Martin T. W. Rosenfeld

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 21, 2010

Abstract

Institutions are common predictors of voter turnout. Most research in this field focuses on cross-country comparisons of voting systems, like the impact of compulsory voting or registration systems. Fewer efforts have been devoted to understand the role of local institutions and their impact on political participation. Especially the impact of divided competences in relation to public good provision and its impact on voter turnout has been widely ignored. In the present paper, we analyze the effects of different institutional settings for inter-municipal cooperation on voter turnout. We use data from local elections in Germany, held in 2003 and 2004. Overall, we analyze aggregate voter turnout of 1661 municipalities and find strong evidence for our hypothesis that local institutional settings are influential in this context. Further, our results indicate that the better competences correspond to the spatial dimension of local public goods, the higher should be the voter turnout.

Publikation lesen

Specialization, Diversity, Competition and their Impact on Local Economic Growth in Germany

Martin T. W. Rosenfeld Annette Illy Michael Schwartz Christoph Hornych

in: Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge , Nr. 68, 2010

Abstract

This study systematically examines the impact of fundamental elements of urban economic structure on urban growth in Germany from 2003 to 2007. We test four elements simultaneously, that is sectoral specialization, diversification of economic activities, urban size as well as the impact of local competition. To account for the effect of varying spatial delimitations in the analysis of urban growth, we further differentiate between cities and planning regions as geographical units. The analysis covers manufacturing industries as well as service sectors. Most previous work produces inconsistent results and concentrates on localization economies and/or diversification, while urban size and the effect of local competition are widely ignored. Our regression results show a U-shaped relationship between localization economies and urban growth and positive effects of local competition on urban growth. With respect to diversification, we find positive effects on urban growth on the city-level, but insignificant results on the level of the planning regions. The impact of urban size also differs between free cities and planning regions; in the former a U-shaped relationship is found whereas the effect is inversely U-shaped for the latter.

Publikation lesen
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