25 Jahre IWH

Dr. Viktor Slavtchev

Dr. Viktor Slavtchev
Aktuelle Position

seit 1/15

Leiter der Forschungsgruppe Innovation, Produktivität und wirtschaftliche Dynamik

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 10/12

Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter der Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Innovation, Humankapital, Entrepreneurship
  • Wirtschaftsentwicklung
  • Regionalökonomik, Industrieökonomik

Viktor Slavtchev ist seit 2012 Mitarbeiter am IWH und leitet die Forschungsgruppe "Innovation, Produktivität und wirtschaftliche Dynamik". Des Weiteren ist er Mitglied des Exekutivkomitees von CompNet.

Er studierte Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. Er war Mitarbeiter im Fachgebiet „Wirtschaftspolitik“ und „Unternehmensentwicklung, Innovation und Wirtschaftlicher Wandel“ an der Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena sowie in „Entrepreneurship, Public Policy and Growth“ am Max-Planck-Institut für Ökonomik in Jena. Viktor Slavtchev promovierte an der Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena.

Ihr Kontakt

Dr. Viktor Slavtchev
Dr. Viktor Slavtchev
Mitglied - Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität
Nachricht senden +49 345 7753-743

Publikationen

Parent Universities and the Location of Academic Startups

S. Heblich Viktor Slavtchev

in: Small Business Economics , Nr. 1, 2014

Abstract

Academic startups are thought to locate in their parent university’s home region because geographic proximity to a university facilitates access to academic knowledge and resources. In this paper we analyze the importance of a different channel, namely social ties between academic entrepreneurs and university researchers, for the access to academic knowledge and resources, and therefore for the location of the startups. We employ unique data on academic startups from regions with more than one university and find that only the parent university influences academic entrepreneurs’ decisions to stay in the region while other universities in the same region play no role. Our findings suggest that geographic proximity to a university may not per se guarantee access to knowledge and resources; social contacts are additionally required. The importance of social ties implies that academic knowledge and resources are not necessarily local public goods. This holds implications for universities’ role in stimulating regional development.

Publikation lesen

cover_american-economic-journal-macroeconomics.jpg

Does the Technological Content of Government Demand Matter for Private R&D? Evidence from US States

Viktor Slavtchev S. Wiederhold

in: American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics , Nr. 2, 2016

Abstract

Governments purchase everything from airplanes to zucchini. This paper investigates the role of the technological content of government procurement in innovation. In a theoretical model, we first show that a shift in the composition of public purchases toward high-tech products translates into higher economy-wide returns to innovation, leading to an increase in the aggregate level of private R&D. Using unique data on federal procurement in US states and performing panel fixed-effects estimations, we find support for the model's prediction of a positive R&D effect of the technological content of government procurement. Instrumental-variable estimations suggest a causal interpretation of our findings.

Publikation lesen

cover_journal-of-technology-transfer.jpg

Support for Public Research Spin-offs by the Parent Organizations and the Speed of Commercialization

Viktor Slavtchev D. Göktepe-Hultén

in: The Journal of Technology Transfer , Nr. 6, 2016

Abstract

We empirically analyze whether support by the parent organization in the early (nascent and seed) stage speeds up the process of commercialization and helps spin-offs from public research organizations generate first revenues sooner. To identify the impact of support by the parent organization, we apply multivariate regression techniques as well as an instrumental variable approach. Our results show that support in the early stage by the parent organization can speed up commercialization. Moreover, we identify two distinct channels—the help in developing a business plan and in acquiring external capital—through which support by the parent organization can enable spin-offs to generate first revenues sooner.

Publikation lesen

Arbeitspapiere

Cover_IWH-Discussion-Papers_2016.jpg

Does the Technological Content of Government Demand Matter for Private R&D? Evidence from US States

Viktor Slavtchev S. Wiederhold

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 10, 2014

Abstract

Governments purchase everything from airplanes to zucchini. This paper investigates the role of the technological content of government procurement in innovation. We theoretically show that a shift in the composition of public purchases toward high-tech products translates into higher economy-wide returns to innovation, leading to an increase in the aggregate level of private research and development (R&D). Collecting unique panel data on federal procurement in US states, we find that reshuffling procurement toward high-tech industries has an economically and statistically significant positive effect on private R&D, even after extensively controlling for other R&D determinants. Instrumental-variable estimations support a causal interpretation of our findings.

Publikation lesen

Cover_IWH-Discussion-Papers_2016.jpg

Support for Public Research Spin-offs by the Parent Organizations and the Speed of Commercialization

Viktor Slavtchev D. Göktepe-Hultén

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 16, 2015

Abstract

We empirically analyze whether support by the parent organization in the early (nascent and seed) stage speeds up the process of commercialization and helps spin-offs from public research organizations generate first revenues sooner. To identify the impact of support by the parent organization, we apply multivariate regression techniques as well as an instrumental variable approach. Our results show that support in the early stage by the parent organization can speed up commercialization. Moreover, we identify two distinct channels - the help in developing a business plan and in acquiring external capital - through which support by the parent organization can enable spin-offs to generate first revenues sooner.

Publikation lesen

Technological Intensity of Government Demand and Innovation

Viktor Slavtchev S. Wiederhold

in: Ifo Working Papers , Nr. 135, 2012

Abstract

Governments purchase everything from airplanes to zucchini. This paper investigates whether the technological intensity of government demand affects corporate R&D activities. In a quality-ladder model of endogenous growth, we show that an increase in the share of government purchases in high-tech industries increases the rewards for innovation, and stimulates private-sector R&D at the aggregate level. We test this prediction using administrative data on federal procurement performed in US states. Both panel fixed effects and instrumental variable estimations provide results in line with the model. Our findings bring public procurement within the realm of the innovation policy debate.

Publikation lesen
Mitglied der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft LogoTotal-Equality-LogoWeltoffen Logo