25 Jahre IWH

Dr. Alexander Kubis

Dr. Alexander Kubis
Aktuelle Position

seit 7/12

Research Affiliate

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 3/11

wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter

Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB) Nürnberg

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Regionalökonomik
  • Arbeitsmarktökonomik
  • Humankapital

Dr. Alexander Kubis ist wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB) Nürnberg.

Seine Expertise in den Bereichen der Regional- und Arbeitsmarktökonomik sowie der räumlichen Ökonometrie wird Dr. Kubis künftig im Rahmen der IWH-Forschungsprojekte zu Determinanten der Humankapitalmobilität sowie zu den Bestimmungsgründen und Folgen der räumlichen Verflechtungen von wirtschaftlicher Aktivität einbringen.

Ihr Kontakt

Dr. Alexander Kubis
Dr. Alexander Kubis
Mitglied - Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität
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Publikationen

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Actors and Interactions – Identifying the Role of Industrial Clusters for Regional Production and Knowledge Generation Activities

Mirko Titze Matthias Brachert Alexander Kubis

in: Growth and Change, Nr. 2, 2014

Abstract

This paper contributes to the empirical literature on systematic methodologies for the identification of industrial clusters. It combines a measure of spatial concentration, qualitative input–output analysis, and a knowledge interaction matrix to identify the production and knowledge generation activities of industrial clusters in the Federal State of Saxony in Germany. It describes the spatial allocation of the industrial clusters, identifies potentials for value chain industry clusters, and relates the production activities to the activities of knowledge generation in Saxony. It finds only a small overlap in the production activities of industrial clusters and general knowledge generation activities in the region, mainly driven by the high-tech industrial cluster in the semiconductor industry. Furthermore, the approach makes clear that a sole focus on production activities for industrial cluster analysis limits the identification of innovative actors.

Publikation lesen

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Human Capital Mobility and Regional Convergence

Lutz Schneider Alexander Kubis

in: Regional Studies, 2012

Publikation lesen

Selektivität, soziale Bindung und räumliche Mobilität - Eine Analyse der Rückkehrpräferenz nach Ostdeutschland

Lutz Schneider Alexander Kubis D. Wiest

in: Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsgeographie, Nr. -1, 2011

Abstract

Selectivity, social ties and spatial mobility. An analysis of preferences for return migration to East Germany. In the public debate, brain drain from East Germany is supposed to be the most critical trend regarding the development and catching up of the New Länder. Therefore, potential for in- and re-migration has attracted much attention at least in the political context. Our contribution analyses the remigration potential on basis of data from a DFG research project focussing on the re-migration intentions of people formerly emigrated from Saxony-Anhalt. The analysis concentrates on the following aspects: the effect of job market success after emigration; the impact of social ties to the origin and the host region and on the selectivity of re-migration preferences. The econometric results confirm several expected effects: On the one hand an individual’s job market success reduces the intention to return. Likewise, the re-migration preference increases for people whose expectations were disappointed. On the other hand, the relevance of social ties to the origin region for re-migration dispositions is confirmed by the estimations. Yet, regarding selectivity of re-migration preferences in terms of human capital econometric results are somewhat ambiguous.

Publikation lesen

Arbeitspapiere

Related Variety, Unrelated Variety and Regional Functions: A spatial panel approach

Matthias Brachert Alexander Kubis Mirko Titze

in: Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography, 2013

Abstract

The paper presents estimates for the impact of related variety, unrelated variety and the functions a region performs in the production process on regional employment growth in Germany. We argue that regions benefit from the existence of related activities that facilitate economic development. Thereby the sole reliance of the related and unrelated variety concept on standard industrial classifications (SIC) remains debatable. We offer estimations for establishing that conceptual progress can be made when the focus of analysis goes beyond solely considering industries. We develop an industry-function based approach of related and unrelated variety and test our hypothesis by the help of spatial panel approach. Our findings suggest that related variety as same as unrelated variety facilitate regional employment growth in Germany. However, the drivers behind these effects do differ. While the positive effect of related variety is driven by high degrees of relatedness in the regional “R&D” and “White-Collar”-functions, the effects of unrelated variety are spurred by “Blue Collar”-functions in this period.

Publikation lesen

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Human Capital Mobility and Convergence – A Spatial Dynamic Panel Model of the German Regions

Alexander Kubis Lutz Schneider

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere, Nr. 9, 2012

Abstract

Since the fall of the iron curtain in 1989, the migration deficit of the Eastern part of Germany has accumulated to 1.8 million people, which is over ten percent of its initial population. Depending on their human capital endowment, these migrants might either – in the case of low-skilled migration – accelerate or – in high-skilled case – impede convergence. Due to the availability of detailed data on regional human capital, migration and productivity growth, we are able to test how geographic mobility affects convergence via the human capital selectivity of migration. With regard to the endogeneity of the migration flows and human capital, we apply a dynamic panel data model within the framework of β-convergence and account for spatial dependence. The regressions indicate a positive, robust, but modest effect of a migration surplus on regional productivity growth. After controlling for human capital, the effect of migration decreases; this decrease indicates that skill selectivity is one way that migration impacts growth.

Publikation lesen

Human Capital Mobility and Convergence. A Spatial Dynamic Panel Model of the German Regions

Alexander Kubis Lutz Schneider

in: IAB-Discussion Paper 23/2012, 2012

Abstract

Since the fall of the iron curtain in 1989, the migration deficit of the Eastern part of Germany has accumulated to 1.8 million people, which is over 10 percent of its ini-tial population. Depending on their human capital endowment, these migrants might either – in the case of low-skilled migration – accelerate or – in high-skilled case– impede convergence. Due to the availability of detailed data on regional human capital, migration and productivity growth, we are able to test how geographic mobil-ity affects convergence via the human capital selectivity of migration. With regard to the endogeneity of the migration flows and human capital, we apply a dynamic panel data model within the framework of β-convergence and account for spatial depend-ence. The regressions indicate a positive, robust, but modest effect of a migration surplus on regional productivity growth. After controlling for human capital, the effect of migration decreases; this decrease indicates that skill selectivity is one way that migration impacts growth.

Publikation lesen
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