Reports of the European Forecasting Network (EFN)

The European Forecasting Network (EFN) was a group of macroeconomic experts from different European research institutions (such as EUI Florence, Universidad Carlos III Madrid, Universitat de Barcelona, IWH).

From 2001 until the beginning of 2019, EFN regularly (quarterly since 2005) published forecasts for the euro area.

EFN Report Spring 2010: Economic Outlook for the Euro Area in 2010 and 2011

European Forecasting Network

2010

Abstract

The world economy will recover during 2010 and 2011 thanks to ultra-low key interest rates in industrial countries and to the strong growth in emerging markets economies. In the euro area, however, the phasing out of expansive fiscal policies and fiscal consolidation will drag down demand; rising exports will be the main driver of the recovery. Internal demand will have a positive (although small) contribution to growth in 2011. We expect euro area GDP to grow around 1.2% and 1.6% during 2010 and 2011, respectively. Due to rising exports, the industrial sector will resume positive growth in the short run but the intensity of the recovery will be moderate and insufficient to compensate the sharp fall of 2009: at the end of 2011, the industrial production index is expected to be still 10% below its pre-crisis levels.

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EFN Report Winter 2009/10: Economic Outlook for the Euro Area in 2010 and 2011

European Forecasting Network

2010

Abstract

In 2010, the recovery of the world economy will be driven by a strong expansion of production in many emerging markets. Rising exports will be the main driver of the recovery in the euro area. We expect GDP to grow around 1.7% and 1.2% uring 2010 and 2011, respectively. What impedes the recovery is the state of labour markets. In fact, unemployment will continue to rise well into 2011, partly because firms with low capacity utilization will no longer be able to keep workers in employment. The most important reason for the recovery of the real economy appears to be renewed – although still fragile – confidence on financial markets. Official interest rates close to zero and substantial purchases of highly rated assets by important central banks have drastically increased the attractiveness of more risky assets.

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EFN Report Autumn 2009: Economic Outlook for the Euro Area in 2009 and 2010

European Forecasting Network

2009

Abstract

The world wide recovery will put an end to the recession in the euro area in the second half of 2009, but chances for a robust upswing for the year 2010 are slim. We expect GDP to fall around 4.0% in 2009, but a positive growth rate of 0.8% in 2010. However, as unemployment will continue to rise and fiscal policy in member countries with high budget deficits will become restrictive, private consumption is expected to decrease by -0.5% in 2010. Public consumption, public investment and exports will support aggregate demand. Industrial production has bottomed out in the second quarter of 2009. Nevertheless, industrial recovery will take time and average growth rates are expected to be just slightly positive in 2010 (1.1%). It is worth mentioning that this figure has improved significantly since our last report, as world trade has started to recover and some firms are restocking their inventories or reducing them at a slower rate than in the first half of the year. However, private investment will be declining well into next year, as capacity utilization is extremely low and the real costs of financing are not as attractive as interest rate figures appear to suggest.

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EFN Report Summer 2009: Economic Outlook for the Euro Area in 2009 and 2010

European Forecasting Network

2009

Abstract

The euro area is experiencing an unprecedented drop in economic activity in the first semester of 2009. Private consumption is expected to decrease by more than 1% compared with the same period a year earlier, investment by about 10%, and exports by 16%. The only support to aggregate demand comes from public consumption, which increases by 1.5%. We do not forecast any major improvement in the euro area economy for the rest of 2009. We expect a year on year decrease of 4.5% in the euro area Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for 2009, with a drop of 1.2% in private consumption, 9.4% in investment, and 14.9% in exports.

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EFN Report Spring 2009: Economic Outlook for the Euro Area in 2009 and 2010

European Forecasting Network

2009

Abstract

For much of 2009, falling external demand will be the main drag on production in the euro area, with exports expected to decrease by about 13% in 2009. At the same time, the structural problems of the financial sector, combined with the uncertainty on future economic perspectives, will continue to impede investment, which will be reduced by about 6% in 2009. Consumers will benefit from the increase in real wages that started in the summer of 2008 and will – due to the slow reaction of wage setting to the business cycle in most European countries – continue for the year 2009. Thus, private consumption will, albeit shrinking modestly (-0.6%) because of rising unemployment, be a stabilizing factor for the economy in the euro area. A positive contribution will also come from public consumption, whose growth is forecasted at 1% for 2009 and 0.5% for 2010.

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