Macroeconomic Analyses and Forecasts

The research group comprises all macroeconomic analyses, forecasts and policy papers that are carried out on a regular basis at the IWH. These reports contribute significantly to the IWH being one of the leading economic research institutes in Germany. The group focuses on current macroeconomic perspectives in Germany. However, forecasts for an open economy like the German one have to start from thorough and up-to-date analysis of the world economy. Special attention is given to East Germany, Central European countries, and to the European Union as a whole.

Research in this group is linked closely to other projects within the cluster that focus on publishing research papers in refereed journals. In particular, econometric tools developed by Research Group Econometric Tools for Macroeconomic Forecasting and Simulation are applied for the macroeconomic projections, and policy conclusions derived by Research Group Monetary Aggregates, Asset Prices and Real Outcomes are important building blocks for policy recommendations.

IWH Data Project: IWH Macrometer: Macroeconomic Database for the German Länder, East and West Germany

All of the group’s macroeconomic analyses, forecasts and policy papers are available via the Current Forecasting section.

Research Cluster
Macroeconomic Dynamics and Stability

Your contact

Dr Axel Lindner
Dr Axel Lindner
Mitglied - Department Macroeconomics
Send Message +49 345 7753-703

EXTERNAL FUNDING

01.2017 ‐ 12.2017

Flash Estimate of the Quarterly GDP in Germany

Verlagsgruppe Handelsblatt

Dr Katja Heinisch

07.2013 ‐ 06.2016

Joint Economic Forecast

Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWI)

The joint economic forecast is an instrument for evaluating the overall economic situation and development in Germany, the euro area and the rest of the world. For this purpose, forecasts of economic activity are generated for the global economy and its major regions. Economic policy recommendations are derived from these forecasts for the euro area and the German economy. The objective of the joint diagnosis, which is commissioned by the Federal Finance Ministry, is to produce a uniform evaluation by all participating institutes. The results are published twice a year as spring and fall forecasts.

Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller

12.2015 ‐ 12.2016

Conference “How Can We Boost Competition in the Services Sector?”

European Commission

Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller

07.2016 ‐ 06.2022

Joint Economic Forecast

Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWI)

The joint economic forecast is an instrument for evaluating the overall economic situation and development in Germany, the euro area and the rest of the world. For this purpose, forecasts of economic activity are generated for the global economy and its major regions. Economic policy recommendations are derived from these forecasts for the euro area and the German economy. The objective of the joint diagnosis, which is commissioned by the Federal Finance Ministry, is to produce a uniform evaluation by all participating institutes. The results are published twice a year as spring and fall forecasts.

Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller

01.2013 ‐ 12.2018

Flash Estimate of the Quarterly GDP in Germany

Verlagsgruppe Handelsblatt

Dr Katja Heinisch

09.2015 ‐ 03.2016

Messung der Elastizität der veranlagten Einkommensteuer in Relation zu den Unternehmens- und Vermögenseinkommen

Federal Ministry of Finance (BMF)

Dr Götz Zeddies

01.2012 ‐ 12.2015

Quarterly Report on the Economy in Saxony-Anhalt

Ministry of Economy, Science and Digitalisation of the State of Sachsen-Anhalt

Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller

Business Cycle Forecasts and Stress Scenarios

Volkswagen Financial Services AG

Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller

01.2013 ‐ 12.2015

Ökonomische Wirksamkeit der Konjunktur stützenden finanzpolitischen Maßnahmen der Jahre 2008 und 2009

Federal Ministry of Finance (BMF)

Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller

Refereed Publications

cover_journal-of-economic-and-social-measurement.jpg

Alternatives to GDP - Measuring the Impact of Natural Disasters using Panel Data

Jörg Döpke Philip Maschke

in: Journal of Economic and Social Measurement, No. 3, 2016

Abstract

A frequent criticism of GDP states that events that obviously reduce welfare of people can nevertheless increase GDP per capita. We use data of natural disasters as quasi experiments to examine whether alternatives to GDP (Human Development Index, Progress Index, Index of Economic Well-Being and a Happiness Index) lead to more plausible responses to disasters. Applying a Differences-in-Differences approach and estimates from various panels of countries we find no noteworthy differences between the response of real GDP per capita and the responses of suggested alternative welfare measures to a natural disaster except for the Human Development Index.

read publication

cover_list-forum-für-wirtschafts-und-finanzpolitik.jpg

Green Technologies as Industrial Policy Concept? The South of Saxony-Anhalt as a Case Example

Jörg Döpke Philip Maschke C. Altmann D. Bieräugel

in: List Forum für Wirtschafts- und Finanzpolitik, No. 1, 2015

Abstract

The federal action called Energiewende and the Renewable Energy Act (EEG) as part of it have produced hopes in Saxony-Anhalt which were particularly connected with the promotion of green technologies. This paper is composed of an impact analysis of subsidies in general and addresses the impacts of the EEG on companies. Therefore, results of a survey among companies are used that has been conducted in 2013 by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry (CCI) Halle-Dessau in the south of the German State of Saxony-Anhalt.

read publication

cover_applied-economics-quarterly.jpg

Are there Business Cycles “beyond GDP“? Alternative Measures to GDP at Business Cycle Frequencies

Jörg Döpke Philip Maschke

in: Applied Economics Quarterly, No. 2, 2015

Abstract

We discuss properties of alternatives or complements to GDP as a measure of welfare at business cycle frequencies. Our results imply that the suggested indicators show practically no cycle at all and their methodologies can be questioned. First, data are not available at an appropriate quality and frequency. Second, the suggested time series sometimes correlate negatively with each other. Third, cross-section and quasi-panel evidence based on different samples of countries reveals no impact of the stance of the business cycle on some suggested welfare measures. Therefore, alternative welfare measures do not show an equal picture on business cycle frequencies compared to GDP-based measures.

read publication

cover_research-policy.jpg

Can R&D Subsidies Counteract the Economic Crisis? – Macroeconomic Effects in Germany

Hans-Ulrich Brautzsch Jutta Günther Brigitte Loose Udo Ludwig Nicole Nulsch

in: Research Policy, No. 3, 2015

Abstract

During the economic crisis of 2008 and 2009, governments in Europe stabilized their economies by means of fiscal policy. After decades of absence, deficit spending was used to counteract the heavy decline in demand. In Germany, public spending went partially into R&D subsidies in favor of small and medium sized enterprises. Applying the standard open input–output model, the paper analyzes the macroeconomic effects of R&D subsidies on employment and production in the business cycle. Findings in the form of backward multipliers suggest that R&D subsidies have stimulated a substantial leverage effect. Almost two thirds of the costs of R&D projects are covered by the enterprises themselves. Overall, a subsidized R&D program results in a production, value added and employment effect that amounts to at least twice the initial financing. Overall, the R&D program counteracts the decline of GDP by 0.5% in the year 2009. In the year 2010 the effects are already procyclical since the German economy recovered quickly. Compared to the strongly discussed alternative uses of subsidies for private consumption, R&D spending is more effective.

read publication

cover_european_journal_of_comparative_economics.jpg

Skill Content of Intra-european Trade Flows

Götz Zeddies

in: European Journal of Comparative Economics, No. 1, 2013

Abstract

In recent decades, the international division of labor has expanded rapidly in the wake of European integration. In this context, especially Western European high-wage countries should have specialized on (human-)capital intensively manufactured goods and should have increasingly sourced labor-intensively manufactured goods, especially parts and components, from Eastern European low wage countries. Since this should be beneficial for the high-skilled and harmful to the lower-qualified workforce in high-wage countries, the opening up of Eastern Europe is often considered as a vital reason for increasing unemployment of the lower-qualified in Western Europe. This paper addresses this issue by analyzing the skill content of Western European countries’ bilateral trade using input-output techniques in order to evaluate possible effects of international trade on labor demand. Thereby, differences in factor inputs and production technologies have been considered, allowing for vertical product differentiation. In this case, skill content of bilateral exports and imports partially differs substantially, especially in bilateral trade between Western and Eastern European countries. According to the results, East-West trade should be harmful particularly to the medium-skilled in Western European countries.

read publication

Working Papers

Mitglied der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft LogoTotal-Equality-LogoWeltoffen Logo