Monetäre Aggregate, Vermögenspreise und realwirtschaftliche Effekte

Diese Forschungsgruppe erforscht – auch vor dem Hintergrund der jüngsten Krisen – den Zusammenhang zwischen monetären Aggregaten, Vermögenspreisen und realwirtschaftlichen Schwankungen. Ein besonderer Schwerpunkt liegt auf der Entwicklung allgemeiner Gleichgewichtsmodelle, die diese Zusammenhänge explizit abbilden.

Forschungscluster
Gesamtwirtschaftliche Dynamik und Stabilität

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Juniorprofessorin Boreum Kwak, Ph.D.
Juniorprofessorin Boreum Kwak, Ph.D.
Mitglied - Abteilung Makroökonomik
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PROJEKTE

01.2017 ‐ 12.2017

Effekte von Wechselkursänderungen auf Produktion und Inflation

Deutsche Bundesbank

Professor Dr. Oliver Holtemöller

Referierte Publikationen

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On the Low-frequency Relationship Between Public Deficits and Inflation

Martin Kliem Alexander Kriwoluzky Samad Sarferaz

in: Journal of Applied Econometrics, Nr. 3, 2016

Abstract

We estimate the low-frequency relationship between fiscal deficits and inflation and pay special attention to its potential time variation by estimating a time-varying vector autoregression model for US data from 1900 to 2011. We find the strongest relationship neither in times of crisis nor in times of high public deficits, but from the mid 1960s up to 1980. Employing a structural decomposition of the low-frequency relationship and further narrative evidence, we interpret our results such that the low-frequency relationship between fiscal deficits and inflation is strongly related to the conduct of monetary policy and its interaction with fiscal policy after World War II.

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Nested Models and Model Uncertainty

Alexander Kriwoluzky Christian A. Stoltenberg

in: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Nr. 2, 2016

Abstract

Uncertainty about the appropriate choice among nested models is a concern for optimal policy when policy prescriptions from those models differ. The standard procedure is to specify a prior over the parameter space, ignoring the special status of submodels (e.g., those resulting from zero restrictions). Following Sims (2008, Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control 32, 2460–2475), we treat nested submodels as probability models, and we formalize a procedure that ensures that submodels are not discarded too easily and do matter for optimal policy. For the United States, we find that optimal policy based on our procedure leads to substantial welfare gains compared to the standard procedure.

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The Diablo 3 Economy: An Agent Based Approach

Makram El-Shagi Gregor von Schweinitz

in: Computational Economics, Nr. 2, 2016

Abstract

Designers of MMOs such as Diablo 3 face economic problems much like policy makers in the real world, e.g. inflation and distributional issues. Solving economic problems through regular updates (patches) became as important to those games as traditional gameplay issues. In this paper we provide an agent framework inspired by the economic features of Diablo 3 and analyze the effect of monetary policy in the game. Our model reproduces a number of features known from the Diablo 3 economy such as a heterogeneous price development, driven almost exclusively by goods of high quality, a highly unequal wealth distribution and strongly decreasing economic mobility. The basic framework presented in this paper is meant as a stepping stone to further research, where our evidence is used to deepen our understanding of the real-world counterparts of such problems. The advantage of our model is that it combines simplicity that is inherent to model economies with a similarly simple observable counterpart (namely the game environment where real agents interact). By matching the dynamics of the game economy we can thus easily verify that our behavioral assumptions are good approximations to reality.

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Monetary Policy and the Transaction Role of Money in the US

Alexander Kriwoluzky Christian A. Stoltenberg

in: The Economic Journal, Nr. 587, 2015

Abstract

The declining importance of money in transactions can explain the well-known fact that US interest rate policy was passive in the pre-Volcker period and active after 1982. We generalise a standard cashless new Keynesian model (Woodford, 2003) by incorporating an explicit transaction role for money. In the pre-Volcker period, we estimate that money did play an important role and determinacy required a passive interest rate policy. However, after 1982, money no longer played an important role in facilitating transactions. Correspondingly, the conventional view prevails and an active policy ensured equilibrium determinacy.

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The Quantity Theory Revisited: A New Structural Approach

Makram El-Shagi Sebastian Giesen

in: Macroeconomic Dynamics, Nr. 1, 2015

Abstract

We propose a unified identification scheme to identify monetary shocks and track their propagation through the economy. We combine three approaches dealing with the consequences of monetary shocks. First, we adjust a state space version of the P-star type model employing money overhang as the driving force of inflation. Second, we identify the contemporaneous impact of monetary policy shocks by applying a sign restriction identification scheme to the reduced form given by the state space signal equations. Third, to ensure that our results are not distorted by the measurement error exhibited by the official monetary data, we employ the Divisia M4 monetary aggregate provided by the Center for Financial Stability. Our approach overcomes one of the major difficulties of previous models by using a data-driven identification of equilibrium velocity. Thus, we are able to show that a P-star model can fit U.S. data and money did indeed matter in the United States.

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Arbeitspapiere

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Same, but Different: Testing Monetary Policy Shock Measures

Alexander Kriwoluzky Stephanie Ettmeier

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere, Nr. 9, 2017

Abstract

In this study, we test whether three popular measures for monetary policy, that is, Romer and Romer (2004), Barakchian and Crowe (2013), and Gertler and Karadi (2015), constitute suitable proxy variables for monetary policy shocks. To this end, we employ different test statistics used in the literature to detect weak proxy variables. We find that the measure derived by Gertler and Karadi (2015) is the most suitable in this regard.

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Do We Need New Modelling Approaches in Macroeconomics?

Claudia M. Buch Oliver Holtemöller

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere, Nr. 8, 2014

Abstract

The economic and financial crisis that emerged in 2008 also initiated an intense discussion on macroeconomic research and the role of economists in society. The debate focuses on three main issues. Firstly, it is argued that economists failed to predict the crisis and to design early warning systems. Secondly, it is claimed that economists use models of the macroeconomy which fail to integrate financial markets and which are inadequate to model large economic crises. Thirdly, the issue has been raised that economists invoke unrealistic assumptions concerning human behaviour by assuming that all agents are self-centred, rationally optimizing individuals. In this paper, we focus on the first two issues. Overall, our thrust is that the above statements are a caricature of modern economic theory and empirics. A rich field of research developed already before the crisis and picked up shortcomings of previous models.

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Efficiency in the UK Commercial Property Market: A Long-run Perspective

Steven Devaney Oliver Holtemöller R. Schulz

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere, Nr. 15, 2012

Abstract

Informationally efficient prices are a necessary requirement for optimal resource allocation in the real estate market. Prices are informationally efficient if they reflect buildings’ benefit to marginal buyers, thereby taking account of all available information on future market development. Prices that do not reflect available information may lead to over- or undersupply if developers react to these inefficient prices. In this study, we examine the efficiency of the UK commercial property market and the interaction between prices, construction costs, and new supply. We collated a unique data set covering the years 1920 onwards, which we employ in our study. First, we assess if real estate prices were in accordance with present values, thereby testing for informational efficiency. By comparing prices and estimated present values, we can measure informational inefficiency. Second, we assess if developers reacted correctly to price signals. Development (or the lack thereof) should be triggered by deviations between present values and cost; if prices do not reflect present values, then they should have no impact on development decisions.

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Monetary Policy in a World Where Money (Also) Matters

Makram El-Shagi Sebastian Giesen

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere, Nr. 6, 2012

Abstract

While the long-run relation between money and inflation as predicted by the quantity theory is well established, empirical studies of the short-run adjustment process have been inconclusive at best. The literature regarding the validity of the quantity theory within a given economy is mixed. Previous research has found support for quantity theory within a given economy by combining the P-Star, the structural VAR and the monetary aggregation literature. However, these models lack precise modelling of the short-run dynamics by ignoring interest rates as the main policy instrument. Contrarily, most New Keynesian approaches, while excellently modeling the short-run dynamics transmitted through interest rates, ignore the role of money and thus the potential mid-and long-run effects of monetary policy. We propose a parsimonious and fairly unrestrictive econometric model that allows a detailed look into the dynamics of a monetary policy shock by accounting for changes in economic equilibria, such as potential output and money demand, in a framework that allows for both monetarist and New Keynesian transmission mechanisms, while also considering the Barnett critique. While we confirm most New Keynesian findings concerning the short-run dynamics, we also find strong evidence for a substantial role of the quantity of money for price movements.

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