25 Jahre IWH

Juniorprofessor Dr. Felix Noth

Juniorprofessor Dr. Felix Noth
Aktuelle Position

seit 10/16

Stellvertretender Leiter der Abteilung Finanzmärkte

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 3/14

Leiter der Forschungsgruppe Innovationen im finanz- und realwirtschaftlichen Sektor

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 3/14

Juniorprofessor für Banken und Finanzsysteme

Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Magdeburg

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Bankenmärkte und realwirtschaftliches Wachstum
  • Bankenregulierung und Risikoanreize für Banken
  • Naturkatastrophen und Auswirkungen auf Banken

Seit dem 1. März 2014 ist Felix Noth Koordinator der Forschungsgruppe "Innovationen im finanz- und realwirtschaftlichen Sektor" am Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH) und Juniorprofessor für Banken und Finanzsysteme an der Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg (OvGU).

Zwischen 2003 und 2007 studierte er Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, bevor er im September 2007 für seine Doktorarbeit zum Thema "Financial Intermediation and its Consequences for the Real Economy" an die Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main wechselte. Nach erfolgreichem Abschluss der Doktorarbeit im Juni 2011 war Felix Noth bis Februar 2014 wissenschaftlicher Assistent an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main.

Ihr Kontakt

Juniorprofessor Dr. Felix Noth
Juniorprofessor Dr. Felix Noth
Mitglied - Abteilung Finanzmärkte
Nachricht senden +49 345 7753-702

Publikationen

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Structural Reforms in Banking: The Role of Trading

Jan Pieter Krahnen Felix Noth U. Schuewer

in: Journal of Financial Regulation , im Erscheinen

Abstract

In the wake of the recent financial crisis, significant regulatory actions have been taken aimed at limiting risks emanating from banks’ trading activities. The goal of this article is to look at the alternative reforms in the US, the UK and the EU, specifically with respect to the role of proprietary trading. Our conclusions can be summarized as follows: First, the focus on a prohibition of proprietary trading, as reflected in the Volcker Rule in the US and in the current proposal of the European Commission (Barnier proposal), is inadequate. It does not necessarily reduce risk-taking and it is likely to crowd out desired trading activities, thereby possibly affecting financial stability negatively. Second, trading separation into legally distinct or ring-fenced entities within the existing banking organizations, as suggested under the Vickers proposal for the UK and the Liikanen proposal for the EU, is a more effective solution. Separation limits cross-subsidies between banking and proprietary trading and diminishes contagion risk, while still allowing for synergies and risk management across banking, non-proprietary trading, and proprietary trading.

Publikation lesen

How Do Insured Deposits Affect Bank Risk? Evidence from the 2008 Emergency Economic Stabilization Act

Claudia Lambert Felix Noth Ulrich Schüwer

in: Journal of Financial Intermediation , 2017

Abstract

This paper tests whether an increase in insured deposits causes banks to become more risky. We use variation introduced by the U.S. Emergency Economic Stabilization Act in October 2008, which increased the deposit insurance coverage from $100,000 to $250,000 per depositor and bank. For some banks, the amount of insured deposits increased significantly; for others, it was a minor change. Our analysis shows that the more affected banks increase their investments in risky commercial real estate loans and become more risky relative to unaffected banks following the change. This effect is most distinct for affected banks that are low capitalized.

Publikation lesen

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Bank Risk Proxies and the Crisis of 2007/09: a Comparison

Felix Noth Lena Tonzer

in: Applied Economics Letters , Nr. 7, 2017

Abstract

The global financial crisis has again shown that it is important to understand the emergence and measurement of risks in the banking sector. However, there is no consensus in the literature which risk proxy works best at the level of the individual bank. A commonly used measure in applied work is the Z-score, which might suffer from calculation issues given poor data quality. Motivated by the variety of bank risk proxies, our analysis reveals that nonperforming assets are a well-suited complement to the Z-score in studies of bank risk.

Publikation lesen

Arbeitspapiere

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Bank-specific Shocks and House Price Growth in the U.S.

F. Bremus Thomas Krause Felix Noth

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 3, 2017

Abstract

This paper investigates the link between mortgage supply shocks at the banklevel and regional house price growth in the U.S. using micro-level data on mortgage markets from the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act for the 1990-2014 period. Our results suggest that bank-specific mortgage supply shocks indeed affect house price growth at the regional level. The larger the idiosyncratic shocks to newly issued mortgages, the stronger is house price growth. We show that the positive link between idiosyncratic mortgage shocks and regional house price growth is very robust and economically meaningful, however not very persistent since it fades out after two years.

Publikation lesen

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Financial Transaction Taxes: Announcement Effects, Short-run Effects, and Long-run Effects

Sebastian Eichfelder Mona Lau Felix Noth

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 4, 2017

Abstract

We analyze the impact of the French 2012 financial transaction tax (FTT) on trading volumes, stock prices, liquidity, and volatility. We extend the empirical research by identifying FTT announcement and short-run treatment effects, which can distort difference-in-differences estimates. In addition, we consider long-run volatility measures that better fit the French FTT’s legislative design. While we find strong evidence of a positive FTT announcement effect on trading volumes, there is almost no statistically significant evidence of a long-run treatment effect. Thus, evidence of a strong reduction of trading volumes resulting from the French FTT might be driven by announcement effects and short-term treatment effects. We find evidence of an increase of intraday volatilities in the announcement period and a significant reduction of weekly and monthly volatilities in the treatment period. Our findings support theoretical considerations suggesting a stabilizing impact of FTTs on financial markets.

Publikation lesen

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Banking Globalization, Local Lending, and Labor Market Effects: Micro-level Evidence from Brazil

Felix Noth Matias Ossandon Busch

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 7, 2017

Abstract

This paper estimates the effect of a foreign funding shock to banks in Brazil after the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008. Our robust results show that bank-specific shocks to Brazilian parent banks negatively affected lending by their individual branches and trigger real economic consequences in Brazilian municipalities: More affected regions face restrictions in aggregated credit and show weaker labor market performance in the aftermath which documents the transmission mechanism of the global financial crisis to local labor markets in emerging countries. The results represent relevant information for regulators concerned with the real effects of cross-border liquidity shocks.

Publikation lesen
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