25 Jahre IWH

Professor Reint E. Gropp, Ph.D.

Professor Reint E. Gropp, Ph.D.
Aktuelle Position

seit 11/14

Präsident

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 10/14

Universitätsprofessor für Volkswirtschaftslehre


Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Magdeburg

seit 10/08

Fellow

Center for Financial Studies (CFS), Frankfurt

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Finanzökonomik
  • Makroökonomik
  • Unternehmensfinanzierung
  • Geld und Banken

Seit November 2014 hat Reint E. Gropp das Amt des Präsidenten des IWH inne und ist Inhaber eines Lehrstuhls für Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg. Er ist Fellow des Center for Financial Studies, Frankfurt, und Mit-Herausgeber des Review of Finance. Als Berater ist er unter anderem für die Bank of Canada und die Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco tätig.

Reint E. Gropp hat Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Universität Freiburg und der University of Wisconsin, Madison, studiert. Im Jahr 1994 schloss er dort seine Promotion in Economics ab. Vor seinem Amtsantritt am IWH war er Professor an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und hatte dort die Stiftungsprofessur für Sustainable Banking and Finance inne. Zuvor war er in verschiedenen Positionen für den Internationalen Währungsfonds (IWF) sowie für die Europäische Zentralbank (EZB) tätig, zuletzt als Deputy Head der Financial Research Division.

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Professor Reint E. Gropp, Ph.D.
Professor Reint E. Gropp, Ph.D.
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Publikationen

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Spillover Effects among Financial Institutions: A State-Dependent Sensitivity Value-at-Risk Approach

Z. Adams R. Füss Reint E. Gropp

in: Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis , Nr. 3, 2014

Abstract

In this paper, we develop a state-dependent sensitivity value-at-risk (SDSVaR) approach that enables us to quantify the direction, size, and duration of risk spillovers among financial institutions as a function of the state of financial markets (tranquil, normal, and volatile). For four sets of major financial institutions (commercial banks, investment banks, hedge funds, and insurance companies) we show that while small during normal times, equivalent shocks lead to considerable spillover effects in volatile market periods. Commercial banks and, especially, hedge funds appear to play a major role in the transmission of shocks to other financial institutions.

Publikation lesen

Payment Defaults and Interfirm Liquidity Provision

F. Boissay Reint E. Gropp

in: Review of Finance , Nr. 6, 2013

Abstract

Using a unique data set on French firms, we show that credit constrained firms that face liquidity shocks are more likely to default on their payments to suppliers. Credit constrained firms pass on a sizeable fraction of such shocks to their suppliers. This is consistent with the idea that firms provide liquidity insurance to each other and that this mechanism is able to alleviate credit constraints. We show that the chain of defaults stops when it reaches unconstrained firms. Liquidity appears to be allocated from firms with access to outside finance to credit constrained firms along supply chains.

Publikation lesen

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The Effect of Personal Bankruptcy Exemptions on Investment in Home Equity

S. Corradin Reint E. Gropp H. Huizinga Luc Laeven

in: Journal of Financial Intermediation , 2016

Abstract

Homestead exemptions to personal bankruptcy allow households to retain their home equity up to a limit determined at the state level. Households that may experience bankruptcy thus have an incentive to bias their portfolios towards home equity. Using US household data for the period 1996 to 2006, we find that household demand for real estate is relatively high if the marginal investment in home equity is covered by the exemption. The home equity bias is more pronounced for younger and less healthy households that face more financial uncertainty and therefore have a higher ex ante probability of bankruptcy. These results suggest that homestead exemptions have an important bearing on the portfolio allocation of US households and the extent to which they insure against bad shocks.

Publikation lesen

Arbeitspapiere

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International Banking Conglomerates and the Transmission of Lending Shocks Across Borders

Reint E. Gropp Deyan Radev

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 19, 2017

Abstract

We investigate how solvency and wholesale funding shocks to 84 OECD parent banks affect the lending of 375 foreign subsidiaries. We find that parent solvency shocks are more important than wholesale funding shocks for subsidiary lending. Furthermore, we find that parent undercapitalisation does not affect the transmission of shocks, while wholesale shocks transmit to foreign subsidiaries of parents that rely primarily on wholesale funding. We also find that transmission is affected by the strategic role of the subsidiary for the parent and follows a locational, rather than an organizational pecking order. Surprisingly, liquidity regulation exacerbates the transmission of adverse wholesale shocks. We further document that parent banks tend to use their own capital and liquidity buffers first, before transmitting. Finally, we show that solvency shocks have higher impact on large subsidiary banks with low growth opportunities in mature markets.

Publikation lesen

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Social Centralisation, Bank Integration and the Transmission of Lending Shocks

Reint E. Gropp Deyan Radev

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 18, 2017

Abstract

We introduce an innovative approach to measure bank integration, based on the corporate culture of multinational banking conglomerates. The new measure, the Power Index, assesses the prevalence of a language of power and authority in the financial reports of global banks. We employ a two-step approach: As a first step, we investigate whether parent-bank or parent-country characteristics are more important for bank integration. In a second step, we analyse whether bank integration affects the transmission of shocks across borders. We find that the level of integration of global banks is determined by parent-bank-specific factors as well as by the social centralisation in the parent’s country: Ethnically diverse and linguistically homogenous countries nurture decentralised corporate structures. Political and economic factors, such as corruption, political rights and economic development also affect bank integration. Furthermore, we find that organisational integration affects the transmission of exogenous shocks from parent banks to their subsidiaries: The more centralised a global bank is, the lower the lending of its subsidiaries after a solvency shock. Wholesale shocks do not appear to be transmitted through this channel. Also, past experience with solvency shocks reduces the integration between parents and subsidiaries.

Publikation lesen

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Suppliers as Liquidity Insurers

Reint E. Gropp Daniel Corsten Panos Markou

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 8, 2017

Abstract

We examine how financial constraints in portfolios of suppliers affect cash holdings at the level of the customer. Utilizing a data set of private and public French companies and their suppliers, we show that customers rely on their financially unconstrained suppliers to provide them with backup liquidity, and that they stockpile approximately 10% less cash than customers with constrained suppliers. This effect persisted during the global financial crisis, highlighting that suppliers may be viable insurers of liquidity even when financing from banks and other external channels is unavailable. We further show that customers with unconstrained suppliers also simultaneously receive more trade credit; that the reduction in cash holdings is greater for firms with stronger ties to their unconstrained suppliers; and that customers reduce their cash holdings following a significant relaxation in their suppliers’ financial constraints through an IPO. Taken together, the results provide important nuance regarding the implications of supplier portfolios and financial constraints on firm liquidity management.

Publikation lesen
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