25 Years IWH

PD Dr Mirko Titze

PD Dr Mirko Titze
Current Position

since 4/14

Head of the Centre for Evidence-Based Policy Consulting (IWH-CEP)

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

since 1/13

Head of the Research Group The Performance of Firms and Regions: Determinants and the Evaluation of Industrial Policy

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

since 7/06

Economist in the Department of Structural Change and Productivity

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

Research Interests

  • convergence of regional economic development (focus East-Germany, new EU members)
  • efficiency of subsidization in the EU

Mirko Titze is Senior Economist in the Department of Structural Change and Productivity. He coordinates the Research Group “The Performance of Firms and Regions: Determinants and the Evaluation of Industrial Policy”. Furthermore, Mirko Titze is head of the “Centre for Evidence-Based Policy Consulting” (IWH-CEP).

Mirko Titze graduated at the Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg and habilitated at the Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg. From 2011 to 2013, Mirko Titze worked as an interim professor at the chair of Regional Policy at the faculty of Spatial Planning at the TU Dortmund University (formerly Professor Dr. Franz-Josef Bade).

Your contact

PD Dr Mirko Titze
PD Dr Mirko Titze
Mitglied - Department Präsidialbereich
Send Message +49 345 7753-861

Publications

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Benchmark Value-added Chains and Regional Clusters in R&D-intensive Industries

Reinhold Kosfeld Mirko Titze

in: International Regional Science Review , forthcoming

Abstract

Although the phase of euphoria seems to be over, policy makers and regional agencies have maintained their interest in cluster policy. Modern cluster theory provides reasons for positive external effects that may accrue from interaction in a group of proximate enterprises operating in common and related fields. Although there has been some progress in locating clusters, in most cases only limited knowledge on the geographical extent of regional clusters has been established. In the present article, we present a hybrid approach to cluster identification. Dominant buyer–supplier relationships are derived by qualitative input–output analysis from national input–output tables, and potential regional clusters are identified by spatial scanning. This procedure is employed to identify clusters of German research and development-intensive industries. A sensitivity analysis reveals good robustness properties of the hybrid approach with respect to variations in the quantitative cluster composition.

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Identifying Industrial Clusters from a Multidimensional Perspective: Methodical Aspects with an Application to Germany

Matthias Brachert Mirko Titze Alexander Kubis

in: Papers in Regional Science , No. 2, 2011

Abstract

If regional development agencies assume the cluster concept to be an adequate framework to promote regional growth and competitiveness, it is necessary to identify industrial clusters in a comprehensive manner. Previous studies used a diversity of methods to identify the predominant concentrations of economic activity in one industrial sector in a region. This paper is based on a multidimensional approach developed by Titze et al. With the help of the combination of concentration measures and input–output methods they were able to identify horizontal and vertical dimensions of industrial clusters. This paper aims to refine this approach by using a superior measure of spatial concentration and by integrating information about spatial interdependence of industrial cluster structures to contribute to a more adequate framework for industrial cluster identification.

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On the Simultaneity Bias in the Relationship Between Risk Attitudes, Entry into Entrepreneurship and Entrepreneurial Survival

Matthias Brachert Walter Hyll Mirko Titze

in: Applied Economics Letters , No. 7, 2017

Abstract

We consider the simultaneity bias when examining the effect of individual risk attitudes on entrepreneurship. We demonstrate that entry into self-employment is related to changes in risk attitudes. We further show that these changes are correlated with the probability to remain in entrepreneurship.

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Working Papers

Related Variety, Unrelated Variety and Regional Functions: A spatial panel approach

Matthias Brachert Alexander Kubis Mirko Titze

in: Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography , 2013

Abstract

The paper presents estimates for the impact of related variety, unrelated variety and the functions a region performs in the production process on regional employment growth in Germany. We argue that regions benefit from the existence of related activities that facilitate economic development. Thereby the sole reliance of the related and unrelated variety concept on standard industrial classifications (SIC) remains debatable. We offer estimations for establishing that conceptual progress can be made when the focus of analysis goes beyond solely considering industries. We develop an industry-function based approach of related and unrelated variety and test our hypothesis by the help of spatial panel approach. Our findings suggest that related variety as same as unrelated variety facilitate regional employment growth in Germany. However, the drivers behind these effects do differ. While the positive effect of related variety is driven by high degrees of relatedness in the regional “R&D” and “White-Collar”-functions, the effects of unrelated variety are spurred by “Blue Collar”-functions in this period.

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Identifying the Effects of Place-based Policies – Causal Evidence from Germany

Eva Dettmann Matthias Brachert Mirko Titze

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 18, 2016

Abstract

The German government provides discretionary investment grants to structurally weak regions to reduce regional disparities. We use a regression discontinuity design that exploits an exogenous discrete jump in the probability of receiving investment grants to identify the causal effects of the investment grant on regional outcomes. We find positive effects for regional gross value-added and productivity growth, but no effects for employment and gross wage growth.

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Does Proximity Matter in the Choice of Partners in Collaborative R&D Projects? – An Empirical Analysis of Granted Projects in Germany

Mirko Titze Philipp Marek Ulrich Blum Clemens Fuhrmeister

in: IWH Discussion Papers , No. 12, 2014

Abstract

This paper contributes to the discussion on the importance of physical distance in the emergence of cross-region collaborative Research and Development (R&D) interactions. The proximity theory, and its extensions, is used as a theoretical framework. A spatial interaction model for count data was implemented for the empirical analysis of German data from the period from 2005 to 2010. The results show that all tested proximity measurements (geographical, cognitive, social and institutional proximity) have a significant positive influence on collaboration intensity. The proximity paradox, however, cannot be confirmed for geographical, social and institutional proximity, but for cognitive proximity.

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