Dr. Matthias Brachert

Dr. Matthias Brachert
Aktuelle Position

seit 11/07

Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter der Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Wirtschaftsgeographie
  • Stadtökonomik
  • Evaluation wirtschaftspolitischer Maßnahmen

Matthias Brachert ist seit 2007 wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter in der Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität. Zu seinen Forschungsschwerpunkten zählen stadt- und regionalökonomische Fragestellungen sowie die Evaluation wirtschaftspolitischer Maßnahmen.

Matthias Brachert studierte an der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg und der University of Reunion Island in Frankreich. Er promovierte an der Utrecht University.

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Dr. Matthias Brachert
Dr. Matthias Brachert
Mitglied - Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität
Nachricht senden +49 345 7753-870

Publikationen

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Entry into Self-employment and Individuals’ Risk-taking Propensities

Matthias Brachert Walter Hyll Abdolkarim Sadrieh

in: Small Business Economics, im Erscheinen

Abstract

Most of the existing empirical literature on self-employment decisions assumes that individuals’ risk-taking propensities are stable over time. We allow for endogeneity on both sides when examining the relationship between individual risk-taking propensities and entry into self-employment. We confirm that a greater risk-taking propensity is associated with a higher probability of entering self-employment. However, we also find evidence that entering self-employment is associated with a significant and substantial increase in an individual’s propensity to take risks. Our findings add to the growing evidence that risk-taking propensities are not only inborn, but also determined by environmental factors.

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Urban Occupational Structures as Information Networks: The Effect on Network Density of Increasing Number of Occupations

Shade T. Shutters José Lobo Rachata Muneepeerakul Deborah Strumsky Charlotta Mellander Matthias Brachert Teresa Farinha Luis M. A. Bettencourt

in: PLOS ONE, im Erscheinen

Abstract

Urban economies are composed of diverse activities, embodied in labor occupations, which depend on one another to produce goods and services. Yet little is known about how the nature and intensity of these interdependences change as cities increase in population size and economic complexity. Understanding the relationship between occupational interdependencies and the number of occupations defining an urban economy is relevant because interdependence within a networked system has implications for system resilience and for how easily can the structure of the network be modified. Here, we represent the interdependencies among occupations in a city as a non-spatial information network, where the strengths of interdependence between pairs of occupations determine the strengths of the links in the network. Using those quantified link strengths we calculate a single metric of interdependence–or connectedness–which is equivalent to the density of a city’s weighted occupational network. We then examine urban systems in six industrialized countries, analyzing how the density of urban occupational networks changes with network size, measured as the number of unique occupations present in an urban workforce. We find that in all six countries, density, or economic interdependence, increases superlinearly with the number of distinct occupations. Because connections among occupations represent flows of information, we provide evidence that connectivity scales superlinearly with network size in information networks.

Publikation lesen

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The Regional Effects of a Place-based Policy – Causal Evidence from Germany

Matthias Brachert Eva Dettmann Mirko Titze

in: Regional Science and Urban Economics, 2019

Abstract

The German government provides discretionary investment grants to structurally weak regions in order to reduce regional inequality. We use a regression discontinuity design that exploits an exogenous discrete jump in the probability of regional actors to receive investment grants to identify the causal effects of the policy. We find positive effects of the programme on district-level gross value-added and productivity growth, but no effects on employment and gross wage growth.

Publikation lesen

Arbeitspapiere

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The Regional Effects of Professional Sports Franchises – Causal Evidence from Four European Football Leagues

Matthias Brachert

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere, Nr. 10, 2018

Abstract

We use the locational pattern of clubs in four major professional football leagues in Europe to test the causal effect of changes in premier league membership on regional employment and output growth at the NUTS 3 level. We rely on the relegation mode of the classical round-robin tournament in the European model of sport to develop a regression-discontinuity design. The results indicate small and significant negative short-term effects on regional employment and output in the sports-related economic sector when clubs are relegated from the premier division of the respective football league. In addition, we find small negative effects on overall regional employment growth. However, total regional gross value added remains unaffected, indicating that in the main it is the less productive jobs that disappear in the short-term.

Publikation lesen

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Identifying the Effects of Place-based Policies – Causal Evidence from Germany

Eva Dettmann Matthias Brachert Mirko Titze

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere, Nr. 18, 2016

Abstract

The German government provides discretionary investment grants to structurally weak regions to reduce regional disparities. We use a regression discontinuity design that exploits an exogenous discrete jump in the probability of receiving investment grants to identify the causal effects of the investment grant on regional outcomes. We find positive effects for regional gross value-added and productivity growth, but no effects for employment and gross wage growth.

Publikation lesen

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On the Stability of Preferences: Repercussions of Entrepreneurship on Risk Attitudes

Matthias Brachert Walter Hyll

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere, Nr. 5, 2014

Abstract

The majority of empirical studies make use of the assumption of stable preferences in searching for a relationship between risk attitude and the decision to become and stay an entrepreneur. Yet empirical evidence on this relationship is limited. In this paper, we show that entry into entrepreneurship itself plays a decisive role in shaping risk preferences. We find that becoming self-employed is indeed associated with a relative increase in risk attitudes, an increase that is quantitatively large and significant even after controlling for individual characteristics, different employment status, and duration of entrepreneurship. The findings suggest that studies assuming that risk attitudes are stable over time suffer from reverse causality; risk attitudes do not remain stable over time, and individual preferences change endogenously.

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