Lars Brausewetter

Lars Brausewetter
Current Position

since 12/21

Economist in the Department of Financial Markets

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

Research Interests

  • macroeconomic policy
  • political economy
  • business cycle analysis and forecasting

Lars Brausewetter joined the Department of Financial Markets as a doctoral student in December 2021. His research focuses on macroeconomic policy as well as inequality and political economy.

Lars Brausewetter received his bachelor's and his master's degree from Leibniz University Hannover. He also studied abroad at Université Côte d'Azur in Nizza and at UC Berkeley in California.

Your contact

Lars Brausewetter
Lars Brausewetter
Mitglied - Department Financial Markets
Send Message +49 345 7753-769

Publications

Working Papers

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Explaining Regional Disparities in Housing Prices Across German Districts

Lars Brausewetter Stephan L. Thomsen Johannes Trunzer

in: IWH Discussion Papers, No. 13, 2022

Abstract

Over the last decade, German housing prices have increased unprecedentedly. Drawing on quality-adjusted housing price data at the district level, we document large and increasing regional disparities: Growth rates were higher in 1) the largest seven cities, 2) districts located in the south, and 3) districts with higher initial price levels. Indications of price bubbles are concentrated in the largest cities and in the purchasing market. Prices seem to be driven by the demand side: Increasing population density, higher shares of academically educated employees and increasing purchasing power explain our findings, while supply remained relatively constrained in the short term.

read publication

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Explaining Regional Disparities in Housing Prices across German Districts

Lars Brausewetter Stephan L. Thomsen Johannes Trunzer

in: IZA Institute of Labor Economics, March 2022

Abstract

Over the last decade, German housing prices have increased unprecedentedly. Drawing on quality-adjusted housing price data at the district level, we document large and increasing regional disparities: growth rates were higher in 1) the largest seven cities, 2) districts located in the south, and 3) districts with higher initial price levels. Indications of price bubbles are concentrated in the largest cities and in the purchasing market. Prices seem to be driven by the demand side: increasing population density, higher shares of academically educated employees and increasing purchasing power explain our findings, while supply remained relatively constrained in the short term.

read publication
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