Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller

Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller
Current Position

since 3/14

Vice President

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

since 8/09

Head of the Department of Macroeconomics

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

since 8/09

Professor of Economics


Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg

Research Interests

  • quantitative macroeconomics, business cycles, and forecasting
  • applied econometrics and time series analysis
  • monetary economics
  • macroeconomic policy
  • environmental macroeconomics

Your contact

Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller
Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller
- Department Macroeconomics
Send Message +49 345 7753-800 Personal page

Publications

Recent Publications

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Effiziente grüne Transformation

Reint E. Gropp Oliver Holtemöller

in: Wirtschaft im Wandel, No. 2, 2024

Abstract

<p>Der deutschen Klimapolitik fehlt die große strategische Linie. Die Menschen werden sich nur dann für mehr Klimaschutz einsetzen und bereit sein, dafür finanzielle Opfer zu bringen, wenn die Lasten des Strukturwandels gerecht verteilt sind. Gerecht heißt, dass dort klimaschädliche Gase eingespart werden, wo es am kostengünstigsten ist. Ohne Märkte und die richtigen Preisanreize geht das nicht.</p>

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Aktuelle Trends: Rückgang der Treibhausgasemissionen im Jahr 2023 etwa zur Hälfte durch Produktionsrückgang bedingt

Oliver Holtemöller

in: Wirtschaft im Wandel, No. 2, 2024

Abstract

<p>Die Treibhausgasemissionen sind im Jahr 2023 in Deutschland um 76 Mio. Tonnen von 750 Mio. Tonnen im Jahr zuvor auf 674 Mio. Tonnen zurückgegangen.<sup>1</sup> Der Rückgang fiel damit deutlich stärker aus als in den Jahren zuvor.</p>

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Sechs Punkte für eine effiziente grüne Transformation

Reint E. Gropp Oliver Holtemöller

in: IWH Policy Notes, No. 2, 2024

Abstract

<p>Die grüne Transformation, verstanden als ein Prozess, Energie zunehmend treibhausgasneutral zu erzeugen, kann mit marktwirtschaftlichen Instrumenten und dafür erforderlichen Rahmenbedingungen kostengünstiger umgesetzt werden als mit staatlicher Steuerung des Energieverbrauchs und der Energieerzeugung. Kosteneffizienz ist von entscheidender Bedeutung für die Bereitschaft und Fähigkeit der Bevölkerung, die Lasten der Transformation zu tragen, und für eine gerechte Verteilung der Lasten.</p>

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Refereed Publications

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International Trade Barriers and Regional Employment: The Case of a No-Deal Brexit

Hans-Ulrich Brautzsch Oliver Holtemöller

in: Journal of Economic Structures, No. 11, 2021

Abstract

We use the World Input–Output Database (WIOD) combined with regional sectoral employment data to estimate the potential regional employment effects of international trade barriers. We study the case of a no-deal Brexit in which imports to the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) would be subject to tariffs and non-tariff trade costs. First, we derive the decline in UK final goods imports from the EU from industry-specific international trade elasticities, tariffs and non-tariff trade costs. Using input–output analysis, we estimate the potential output and employment effects for 56 industries and 43 countries on the national level. The absolute effects would be largest in big EU countries which have close trade relationships with the UK, such as Germany and France. However, there would also be large countries outside the EU which would be heavily affected via global value chains, such as China, for example. The relative effects (in percent of total employment) would be largest in Ireland followed by Belgium. In a second step, we split up the national effects on the NUTS-2 level for EU member states and additionally on the county (NUTS-3) level for Germany. The share of affected workers varies between 0.03% and 3.4% among European NUTS-2 regions and between 0.15% and 0.4% among German counties. A general result is that indirect effects via global value chains, i.e., trade in intermediate inputs, are more important than direct effects via final demand.

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Power Generation and Structural Change: Quantifying Economic Effects of the Coal Phase-out in Germany

Katja Heinisch Oliver Holtemöller Christoph Schult

in: Energy Economics, 2021

Abstract

In the fight against global warming, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is a major objective. In particular, a decrease in electricity generation by coal could contribute to reducing CO2 emissions. We study potential economic consequences of a coal phase-out in Germany, using a multi-region dynamic general equilibrium model. Four regional phase-out scenarios before the end of 2040 are simulated. We find that the worst case phase-out scenario would lead to an increase in the aggregate unemployment rate by about 0.13 [0.09 minimum; 0.18 maximum] percentage points from 2020 to 2040. The effect on regional unemployment rates varies between 0.18 [0.13; 0.22] and 1.07 [1.00; 1.13] percentage points in the lignite regions. A faster coal phase-out can lead to a faster recovery. The coal phase-out leads to migration from German lignite regions to German non-lignite regions and reduces the labour force in the lignite regions by 10,100 [6300; 12,300] people by 2040. A coal phase-out until 2035 is not worse in terms of welfare, consumption and employment compared to a coal-exit until 2040.

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(Since when) are East and West German Business Cycles Synchronised?

Stefan Gießler Katja Heinisch Oliver Holtemöller

in: Jahrbücher für Nationalökonomie und Statistik, No. 1, 2021

Abstract

We analyze whether, and since when, East and West German business cycles are synchronised. We investigate real GDP, unemployment rates and survey data as business cycle indicators and we employ several empirical methods. Overall, we find that the regional business cycles have synchronised over time. GDP-based indicators and survey data show a higher degree of synchronisation than the indicators based on unemployment rates. However, synchronisation among East and West German business cycles seems to have become weaker again recently.

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Working Papers

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Forecasting Economic Activity Using a Neural Network in Uncertain Times: Monte Carlo Evidence and Application to the German GDP

Oliver Holtemöller Boris Kozyrev

in: IWH Discussion Papers, No. 6, 2024

Abstract

In this study, we analyzed the forecasting and nowcasting performance of a generalized regression neural network (GRNN). We provide evidence from Monte Carlo simulations for the relative forecast performance of GRNN depending on the data-generating process. We show that GRNN outperforms an autoregressive benchmark model in many practically relevant cases. Then, we applied GRNN to forecast quarterly German GDP growth by extending univariate GRNN to multivariate and mixed-frequency settings. We could distinguish between “normal” times and situations where the time-series behavior is very different from “normal” times such as during the COVID-19 recession and recovery. GRNN was superior in terms of root mean forecast errors compared to an autoregressive model and to more sophisticated approaches such as dynamic factor models if applied appropriately.

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Globalization, Productivity Growth, and Labor Compensation

Christian Dreger Marius Fourné Oliver Holtemöller

in: IWH Discussion Papers, No. 7, 2022

Abstract

We analyze how changes in international trade integration affect productivity and the functional income distribution. To account for endogeneity, we construct a leaveout measure for international trade integration for country-industry pairs using international input-output tables. Our findings corroborate on the country-industry level that international trade integration increases productivity. Moreover, we show that both trade in intermediate inputs and trade in value added is associated with lower labor shares in emerging markets. For advanced countries, we document a positive effect of trade in value added on the labor share of income. Further, we show that the effects on productivity and labor share are heterogeneous across different sectors. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for a possible throwback in international trade integration due to experiences from recent crises.

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Is there an Information Channel of Monetary Policy?

Oliver Holtemöller Alexander Kriwoluzky Boreum Kwak

in: IWH Discussion Papers, No. 17, 2020

Abstract

Exploiting the heteroscedasticity of the changes in short-term and long-term interest rates and exchange rates around the FOMC announcement, we identify three structural monetary policy shocks. We eliminate the predictable part of the shocks and study their effects on financial variables and macro variables. The first shock resembles a conventional monetary policy shock, and the second resembles an unconventional monetary shock. The third shock leads to an increase in interest rates, stock prices, industrial production, consumer prices, and commodity prices. At the same time, the excess bond premium and uncertainty decrease, and the U.S. dollar depreciates. Therefore, this third shock combines all the characteristics of a central bank information shock.

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