Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller

Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller
Current Position

since 3/14

Vice President

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

since 8/09

Head of the Department of Macroeconomics

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

since 8/09

Professor of Economics


Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg

Research Interests

  • quantitative macroeconomics, business cycles, and forecasting
  • applied econometrics and time series analysis
  • monetary economics
  • macroeconomic policy

Oliver Holtemöller is Professor of Economics at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and head of the Department of Macroeconomics at the Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) since August 2009. Since March 2014, he is also a member of the executive board of the IWH.

Oliver Holtemöller has studied economics, applied mathematics and practical computer science at the Justus-Liebig University in Gießen. He participated in the doctoral programme Applied Microeconomics at the Freie Universität Berlin and at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin from 1998-2001 and obtained his doctoral degree from the Freie Universität Berlin in 2001.

From 2001 to 2003, he was a collaborator in the National Research Center Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes (SFB 373) at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. From 2003 to 2009, he was an Assistant Professor in Economics at RWTH Aachen University.

Your contact

Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller
Professor Dr Oliver Holtemöller
Leiter - Department Macroeconomics
Send Message +49 345 7753-800 Personal page

Publications

Recent Publications

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Power Generation and Structural Change: Quantifying Economic Effects of the Coal Phase-out in Germany

Christoph Schult Katja Heinisch Oliver Holtemöller

in: IWH Discussion Papers, No. 16, 2019

Abstract

In the fight against global warming, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is a major objective. In particular, a decrease in electricity generation by coal could contribute to reducing CO2 emissions. Using a multi-region dynamic general equilibrium model, this paper studies potential economic consequences of a coal phase-out in Germany. Different regional phase-out scenarios are simulated with varying timing structures. We find that a politically induced coal phase-out would lead to an increase in the national unemployment rate by about 0.10 percentage points from 2020 to 2040, depending on the specific scenario. The effect on regional unemployment rates varies between 0.18 to 1.07 percentage points in the lignite regions. However, a faster coal phase-out can lead to a faster recovery. The coal phase-out leads to migration from German lignite regions to German non-lignite regions and reduces the labour force in the lignite regions by 10,000 people by 2040.

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Aktuelle Trends: Der Rückgang der Exporte nach Russland betrifft alle Bundesländer und ist nur zum Teil durch die Sanktionen der EU gegenüber Russland zu erklären

Oliver Holtemöller Martina Kämpfe

in: Wirtschaft im Wandel, No. 2, 2019

Abstract

In den vergangenen 20 Jahren waren die deutschen Exporte nach Russland in Relation zur gesamten Wertschöpfung zweimal rückläufig: zunächst im Jahr 2009 und dann wieder seit etwa dem Jahr 2012, also bevor die Europäische Union 2014 erstmals Handelssanktionen gegenüber Russland verhängte. Betroffen sind alle Bundesländer, der Rückgang dauert meist bis in die heutige Zeit an. Die Sanktionen dürften nur einen Teil des Rückgangs erklären. Vielmehr schwächte sich die Nachfrage nach Investitions- und Konsumgütern aus Russland mit dem Ölpreisverfall und der damit verbundenen Abwertung des Rubels Ende 2014 deutlich ab. Dies betraf nicht nur Deutschland, sondern beispielsweise auch China, das an Sanktionen gegenüber Russland nicht beteiligt ist. Erst 2016, als der Ölpreis wieder stieg, setzte eine teilweise Erholung der russischen Importe ein.

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Klimaschutz und Kohleausstieg: Politische Strategien und Maßnahmen bis 2030 und darüber hinaus

Pao-Yu Oei Casimir Lorenz Sophie Schmalz Hanna Brauers Philipp Herpich Christian von Hirschhausen Claudia Kemfert Barbara Dröschel Jan Hildebrand Juri Horst Uwe Klann Patrick Matschoss Michael Porzig Irina Rau Bernhard Wern Hans-Ulrich Brautzsch Gerhard Heimpold Katja Heinisch Oliver Holtemöller Christoph Schult Hauke Hermann Dirk Heyen Katja Schumacher Cornelia Ziehm

in: Pao-Yu Oei et al., Klimaschutz und Kohleausstieg: Politische Strategien und Maßnahmen bis 2030 und darüber hinaus. Abschlussbericht. Climate Change 27/2019. Dessau-Roßlau: Umweltbundesamt, 2019

Abstract

The present study examines the socio-economic consequences of a climate policy-driven coal phase-out in Germany. A focus lies on the lignite industry – especially in the lignite regions. In a first step, the regions are spatially defined and described. Additional analysis is based on energy economic modelling. The model examines phase-out scenarios, which differ in the chosen criteria for the order of power plant closure (specific emissions or plant age). An input-output-model and a regional macroeconomic model build up on these phase-out pathways and examine the socio economic effects of the phase-out in the lignite regions as well as in the rest of Germany. The combination of both models offers the advantage to consider the phase-out from different perspective and hence derive different and more robust effects. The models show, on the one hand, that in an early phase-out the negative effects of structural change are visible earlier. On the other hand, recuperative effects can counteract the negative consequences according to the regional economic model. Furthermore, the structural change creates economic opportunities. Those opportunities are primarily diversified economic activities. Case studies show significant employment potentials for the lignite regions. New jobs in renewable energies and energetic optimization of buildings can already counteract the negative employment effects associated with the investigated structural change. The study concludes, describing accompanying political instruments that can support the regions on their way to master the challenges of the up-coming structural change.

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Refereed Publications

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The Effects of Fiscal Policy in an Estimated DSGE Model – The Case of the German Stimulus Packages During the Great Recession

Andrej Drygalla Oliver Holtemöller Konstantin Kiesel

in: Macroeconomic Dynamics, forthcoming

Abstract

In this paper, we analyze the effects of the stimulus packages adopted by the German government during the Great Recession. We employ a standard medium-scale dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model extended by non-optimizing households and a detailed fiscal sector. In particular, the dynamics of spending and revenue variables are modeled as feedback rules with respect to the cyclical components of output, hours worked and private investment. Based on the estimated rules, fiscal shocks are identified. According to the results, fiscal policy, in particular public consumption, investment, and transfers prevented a sharper and prolonged decline of German output at the beginning of the Great Recession, suggesting a timely response of fiscal policy. The overall effects, however, are small when compared to other domestic and international shocks that contributed to the economic downturn. Our overall findings are not sensitive to considering fiscal foresight.

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On the Risk of a Sovereign Debt Crisis in Italy

Oliver Holtemöller Tobias Knedlik Axel Lindner

in: Intereconomics, forthcoming

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Expectation Formation, Financial Frictions, and Forecasting Performance of Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Models

Oliver Holtemöller Christoph Schult

in: Historical Social Research, No. 2, Special Issue: Governing by Numbers 2019

Abstract

In this paper, we document the forecasting performance of estimated basic dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models and compare this to extended versions which consider alternative expectation formation assumptions and financial frictions. We also show how standard model features, such as price and wage rigidities, contribute to forecasting performance. It turns out that neither alternative expectation formation behaviour nor financial frictions can systematically increase the forecasting performance of basic DSGE models. Financial frictions improve forecasts only during periods of financial crises. However, traditional price and wage rigidities systematically help to increase the forecasting performance.

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Working Papers

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Power Generation and Structural Change: Quantifying Economic Effects of the Coal Phase-out in Germany

Christoph Schult Katja Heinisch Oliver Holtemöller

in: IWH Discussion Papers, No. 16, 2019

Abstract

In the fight against global warming, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is a major objective. In particular, a decrease in electricity generation by coal could contribute to reducing CO2 emissions. Using a multi-region dynamic general equilibrium model, this paper studies potential economic consequences of a coal phase-out in Germany. Different regional phase-out scenarios are simulated with varying timing structures. We find that a politically induced coal phase-out would lead to an increase in the national unemployment rate by about 0.10 percentage points from 2020 to 2040, depending on the specific scenario. The effect on regional unemployment rates varies between 0.18 to 1.07 percentage points in the lignite regions. However, a faster coal phase-out can lead to a faster recovery. The coal phase-out leads to migration from German lignite regions to German non-lignite regions and reduces the labour force in the lignite regions by 10,000 people by 2040.

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(Since When) Are East and West German Business Cycles Synchronised?

Stefan Gießler Katja Heinisch Oliver Holtemöller

in: IWH Discussion Papers, No. 7, 2019

Abstract

This paper analyses whether and since when East and West German business cycles are synchronised. We investigate real GDP, unemployment rates and survey data as business cycle indicators and employ several empirical methods. Overall, we find that the regional business cycles have synchronised over time. GDP-based indicators and survey data show a higher degree of synchronisation than the indicators based on unemployment rates. However, recently synchronisation among East and West German business cycles seems to become weaker, in line with international evidence.

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Potential International Employment Effects of a Hard Brexit

Hans-Ulrich Brautzsch Oliver Holtemöller

in: IWH Discussion Papers, No. 4, 2019

Abstract

We use the World Input Output Database (WIOD) to estimate the potential employment effects of a hard Brexit in 43 countries. In line with other studies we assume that imports from the European Union (EU) to the UK will decline by 25% after a hard Brexit. The absolute effects are largest in big EU countries which have close trade relationships with the UK like Germany and France. However, there are also large countries outside the EU which are heavily affected via global value chains like China, for example. The relative effects (in percent of total employment) are largest in Malta and Ireland. UK employment will also be affected via intermediate input production. Within Germany, the motor vehicle industry and in particular the “Autostadt” Wolfsburg are most affected.

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