25 Jahre IWH

Professor Dr. Steffen Müller

Professor Dr. Steffen Müller
Aktuelle Position

seit 10/14

Leiter der Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 10/14

Universitätsprofessor für Wirtschaftswissenschaften: Produktivität und Innovation

Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Magdeburg

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • angewandte Ökonometrie
  • empirische Arbeitsmarktökonomik
  • betriebliche Gründungs- und Schließungsdynamik

Seit Oktober 2014 ist Steffen Müller Universitätsprofessor für Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Produktivität und Innovation an der Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg und Leiter der Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität am IWH. Er ist Mitglied im Bevölkerungsökonomischen Ausschuss, im Bildungsökonomischen Ausschuss und im Ausschuss für Sozialpolitik des Vereins für Socialpolitik.

Steffen Müller hat Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Universität Leipzig studiert. Er wechselte im Jahr 2005 an die Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, wo er 2009 bei Professor Regina T. Riphahn promovierte (Dissertation: Mandatory works councils in Germany: their effects on productivity and profits). Er habilitierte sich 2014 ebendort (Lehrbefugnis für Volkswirtschaftslehre und Ökonometrie). Während dieser Zeit forschte Steffen Müller auch an der University of California in Berkeley und in Davis.

Ihr Kontakt

Professor Dr. Steffen Müller
Professor Dr. Steffen Müller
Leiter - Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität
Nachricht senden +49 345 7753-708

Publikationen

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Why Is there Resistance to Works Councils?

Steffen Müller Jens Stegmaier

in: Economic and Industrial Democracy , im Erscheinen

Publikation lesen

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The Dynamic Effects of Works Councils on Labour Productivity: First Evidence from Panel Data

Steffen Müller Jens Stegmaier

in: British Journal of Industrial Relations , Nr. 2, 2017

Abstract

We estimate dynamic effects of works councils on labour productivity using newly available information from West German establishment panel data. Conditioning on plant fixed effects and control variables, we find negative productivity effects during the first five years after council introduction but a steady and substantial increase in the councils’ productivity effect thereafter. Our findings support a causal interpretation for the positive correlation between council existence and plant productivity that has been frequently reported in previous studies.

Publikation lesen

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Transferability of Skills across Sectors and Heterogeneous Displacement Costs

Moises Yi Steffen Müller Jens Stegmaier

in: American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings , Nr. 5, 2017

Abstract

We use rich German administrative data to estimate new measures of skill transferability between manufacturing and other sectors. These measures capture the value of workers' human capital when applied in different sectors and are directly related to workers' displacement costs. We estimate these transferability measures using a selection correction model, which addresses workers' endogenous mobility, and a novel selection instrument based on the social network of workers. Our results indicate substantial heterogeneity in how workers can transfer their skills when they move across sectors, which implies heterogeneous displacement costs that depend on the sector to which workers reallocate.

Publikation lesen

Arbeitspapiere

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Plant-level Employment Development before Collective Displacements: Comparing Mass Layoffs, Plant Closures, and Bankruptcies

Daniel Fackler Steffen Müller Jens Stegmaier

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 27, 2016

Abstract

To assess to what extent collective job displacements can be regarded as unanticipated exogenous shocks for affected employees, we analyze plant-level employment patterns before bankruptcy, plant closure without bankruptcy, and mass layoff. Utilizing administrative data covering all West German private sector plants, we find no systematic employment reductions prior to mass layoffs, a strong and long-lasting reduction prior to closures, and a much shorter shadow of death preceding bankruptcy. Our analysis of worker flows underlines that bankruptcies seem to struggle for survival while closures follow a shrinking strategy. We conclude that the scope of worker anticipation of upcoming job loss is smallest for mass layoffs and largest for closures without bankruptcy.

Publikation lesen

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Paternal Unemployment During Childhood: Causal Effects on Youth Worklessness and Educational Attainment

Steffen Müller Regina T. Riphahn Caroline Schwientek

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 8, 2016

Abstract

Using long-running data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (1984-2012), we investigate the impact of paternal unemployment on child labor market and education outcomes. We first describe correlation patterns and then use sibling fixed effects and the Gottschalk (1996) method to identify the causal effects of paternal unemployment. We find different patterns for sons and daughters. Paternal unemployment does not seem to causally affect the outcomes of sons. In contrast, it increases both daughters‘ worklessness and educational attainment. We test the robustness of the results and explore potential explanations.

Publikation lesen

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Why is there Resistance to Works Councils in Germany? An Economic Perspective

Steffen Müller Jens Stegmaier

in: IWH-Diskussionspapiere , Nr. 23, 2017

Abstract

Recent empirical research generally finds evidence of positive economic effects of works councils, for example with regard to productivity and – with some limitations – to profits. This makes it necessary to explain why employers’ associations have reservations against works councils. On the basis of an in-depth literature analysis, we show that beyond the generally positive findings, there are important heterogeneities in the impact of works councils. We argue that those groups of employers that tend to benefit little from employee participation in terms of productivity and profits may well be important enough to shape the agenda of their employers’ organisation and even gained in importance within their organisations in recent years. We also discuss the role of deviations from profit-maximising behaviour like risk aversion, short-term profit maximisation, and other non-pecuniary motives, as possible reasons for employer resistance.

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