Professor Dr. Boris Hirsch

Professor Dr. Boris Hirsch
Aktuelle Position

 

seit 12/16

Research Fellow der Abteilung Strukturwandel und Produktivität

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 08/16

Professor für Volkswirtschaftslehre

Leuphana Universität Lüneburg

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Arbeitsmarkt
  • industrielle Beziehungen
  • empirische Arbeitsmarktökonomik

Boris Hirsch ist seit Dezember 2016 Research Fellow am IWH. Seine Forschungsinteressen umfassen Modelle unvollkommenen Wettbewerbs am Arbeitsmarkt und deren empirische Überprüfung sowie Fragestellungen der empirischen Arbeitsmarktforschung, industrieller Beziehungen und der Migration.

Seit August 2016 ist Boris Hirsch Universitätsprofessor für Volkswirtschaftslehre mit dem Schwerpunkt Mikroökonometrie und Politikevaluation an der Leuphana Universität Lüneburg. Davor studierte er Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg und Mathematik an der FernUniversität in Hagen.

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Professor Dr. Boris Hirsch
Professor Dr. Boris Hirsch
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Publikationen

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Dual Labor Markets at Work: The Impact of Employers’ Use of Temporary Agency Work on Regular Workers’ Job Stability

Boris Hirsch

in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review , Nr. 5, 2016

Abstract

Fitting duration models on an inflow sample of jobs in Germany starting in 2002 to 2010, the author investigates the impact of employers’ use of temporary agency work on regular workers’ job stability. In line with dual labor market theory, the author finds that nontemporary jobs are significantly more stable when employers use temporary agency workers. The rise in job stability stems mainly from reduced transitions into nonemployment, suggesting that nontemporary workers are safeguarded against involuntary job losses. The findings are robust to controlling for unobserved permanent employer characteristics and changes in the observational window that comprises the labor market disruption of the Great Recession.

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Gender Wage Discrimination: Does the Extent of Competition in Labor Markets Explain why Female Workers are Paid Less than Men?

Boris Hirsch

in: IZA World of Labor , Nr. 310, 2016

Abstract

There are pronounced and persistent wage differences between men and women in all parts of the world. A significant element of these wage disparities can be attributed to differences in worker and workplace characteristics, which are likely to mirror differences in worker productivity. However, a large part of these differences remains unexplained, and it is common to attribute them to discrimination by the employer that is rooted in prejudice against female workers. Yet recent empirical evidence suggests that, to a large extent, the gaps reflect “monopsonistic” wage discrimination—that is, employers exploiting their wage-setting power over women—rather than any sort of prejudice.

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Is There Monopsonistic Discrimination against Immigrants?

Boris Hirsch Elke J. Jahn

in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review , Nr. 3, 2015

Abstract

The authors investigate immigrants’ and natives’ labor supply to the firm within an estimation approach based on a dynamic monopsony framework. Applying duration models that account for unobserved worker heterogeneity to a large administrative employer–employee data set for Germany, they find that immigrants supply labor less elastically to firms than do natives. Under monopsonistic wage setting, the estimated elasticity differential predicts a 7.7 log points wage penalty for immigrants thereby accounting for the entire unexplained native–immigrant wage differential of 5.8 to 8.2 log points. When further distinguishing immigrant groups differing in their time spent in the German labor market, their immigration cohort, and their age at entry, the authors find that the observed unexplained wage differential is larger for those groups that show a larger elasticity differential relative to natives. These findings not only suggest that search frictions are a likely cause of employers’ more pronounced monopsony power over their immigrant workers but also imply that employers profit from discriminating against immigrants.

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