Dr André Diegmann

Dr André Diegmann
Current Position

since 3/21

Head of the Research Group Firm Dynamics and Employment Outcomes

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

since 1/20

Economist in the Department of Structural Change and Productivity

Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH) – Member of the Leibniz Association

Research Interests

  • empirical labour economics
  • firm dynamics
  • political economy
  • economics of crime

André Diegmann joined the Department of Structural Change and Productivity in January 2020. He is Junior Research Associate at the Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW) since June 2020. His research focuses on applied microeconometrics, labour economics, and public economics.

André Diegmann received his master's degree from University of Kassel and his PhD from University of Mannheim. Prior to joining IWH, he was a researcher at ZEW, IAB, and the German Council of Economic Experts.

Your contact

Dr André Diegmann
Dr André Diegmann
Mitglied - Department Structural Change and Productivity
Send Message +49 345 7753-873 Personal page

Publications

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Do Digital Information Technologies Help Unemployed Job Seekers Find a Job? Evidence from the Broadband Internet Expansion in Germany

Nicole Gürtzgen André Diegmann (né Nolte) Laura Pohlan Gerard J. van den Berg

in: European Economic Review, February 2021

Abstract

This paper studies effects of the introduction of a new digital mass medium on reemployment of unemployed job seekers. We combine data on high-speed (broadband) internet availability at the local level with German individual register data. We address endogeneity by exploiting technological peculiarities that affected the roll-out of high-speed internet. The results show that high-speed internet improves reemployment rates after the first months in unemployment. This is confirmed by complementary analyses with individual survey data suggesting that internet access increases online job search and the number of job interviews after a few months in unemployment.

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Does Low-pay Persist across Different Regimes? Evidence from the German Unification

André Diegmann Nicole Gürtzgen

in: Economics of Transition and Institutional Change, No. 3, 2020

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The Internet Effects on Sex Crime Offenses – Evidence from the Broadband Internet Expansion in Germany

André Diegmann

in: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, September 2019

Abstract

This paper studies the effects of the introduction of a new mass medium on sex crime in Germany. I use unique data on criminal offenses and broadband internet measured at the municipal level to shed light on this issue. In order to address endogeneity in broadband internet availability, I exploit technical peculiarities at the regional level that determine the roll-out of high-speed internet. Results provide evidence of a substitution effect of internet exposure on sex crime. The substitution effect is neither driven by differences in reporting behavior, nor by matching processes at the victim and offender side. This suggests that the consumption of extreme media plays an important role in explaining the documented high-speed internet effect.

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Working Papers

Police Reorganization and Crime: Evidence from Police Station Closures

S. Blesse André Diegmann

in: German Council of Economic Experts Working Paper, No. 7, 2019

Abstract

Does the administrative organization of police affect crime? In answering this question, we focus on the reorganization of local police agencies. Specifically, we study the effects police force reallocation via station closures has on local crime. We do this by exploiting a quasi-experiment where a reform substantially reduced the number of police stations. Combining a matching strategy with an event-study design, we find no effects on total theft. Police station closures, however, open up tempting opportunities for criminals in car theft and burglary in residential properties. We can rule out that our effects arise from incapacitation, crime displacement, or changes in employment of local police forces. Our results suggest that criminals are less deterred after police station closures and use the opportunity to steal more costly goods.

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