Professor Reint E. Gropp, Ph.D.

Professor Reint E. Gropp, Ph.D.
Aktuelle Position

seit 11/14

Präsident

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 10/14

Professor für Volkswirtschaftslehre


Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg

seit 1/20

Kommissarischer Leiter der Abteilung Gesetzgebung, Regulierung und Faktormärkte

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Finanzökonomik
  • Makroökonomik
  • Unternehmensfinanzierung
  • Geld und Banken

Reint E. Gropp ist seit 2014 Präsident des IWH und Inhaber eines Lehrstuhls für Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg. Am IWH leitet er die Abteilung Gesetzgebung, Regulierung und Faktormärkte kommissarisch. Er ist Associate Fellow des Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) und Berater verschiedener Zentralbanken. 2021 wurde er zum Sprecher der Sektion-B-Institute der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft gewählt.

Reint E. Gropp hat Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Universität Freiburg und der University of Wisconsin, Madison, studiert. Im Jahr 1994 schloss er dort seine Promotion in Economics ab. Vor seinem Amtsantritt am IWH war er Professor an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und hatte dort die Stiftungsprofessur für Sustainable Banking and Finance inne. Zuvor war er in verschiedenen Positionen für den Internationalen Währungsfonds (IWF) sowie für die Europäische Zentralbank (EZB) tätig, zuletzt als Deputy Head der Financial Research Division.

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Professor Reint E. Gropp, Ph.D.
Professor Reint E. Gropp, Ph.D.
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Publikationen

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Public Bank Guarantees and Allocative Efficiency

Reint E. Gropp Andre Guettler Vahid Saadi

in: Journal of Monetary Economics, December 2020

Abstract

A natural experiment and matched bank/firm data are used to identify the effects of bank guarantees on allocative efficiency. We find that with guarantees in place unproductive firms receive larger loans, invest more, and maintain higher rates of sales and wage growth. Moreover, firms produce less productively. Firms also survive longer in banks’ portfolios and those that enter guaranteed banks’ portfolios are less profitable and productive. Finally, we observe fewer economy-wide firm exits and bankruptcy filings in the presence of guarantees. Overall, the results are consistent with the idea that guaranteed banks keep unproductive firms in business for too long.

Publikation lesen

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Financial Incentives and Loan Officer Behavior: Multitasking and Allocation of Effort under an Incomplete Contract

Patrick Behr Alejandro H. Drexler Reint E. Gropp Andre Guettler

in: Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Nr. 4, 2020

Abstract

We investigate the implications of providing loan officers with a nonlinear compensation structure that rewards loan volume and penalizes poor performance. Using a unique data set provided by a large international commercial bank, we examine the main activities that loan officers perform: loan prospecting, screening, and monitoring. We find that when loan officers are at risk of losing their bonuses, they increase prospecting and monitoring. We further show that loan officers adjust their behavior more toward the end of the month when bonus payments are approaching. These effects are more pronounced for loan officers with longer tenures at the bank.

Publikation lesen

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Banks’ Funding Stress, Lending Supply and Consumption Expenditure

H. Evren Damar Reint E. Gropp Adi Mordel

in: Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Nr. 4, 2020

Abstract

We employ a unique identification strategy linking survey data on household consumption expenditure to bank‐level data to estimate the effects of bank funding stress on consumer credit and consumption expenditures. We show that households whose banks were more exposed to funding shocks report lower levels of nonmortgage liabilities. This, however, only translates into lower levels of consumption for low‐income households. Hence, adverse credit supply shocks are associated with significant heterogeneous effects.

Publikation lesen

Arbeitspapiere

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Supranational Rules, National Discretion: Increasing versus Inflating Regulatory Bank Capital?

Reint E. Gropp Thomas Mosk Steven Ongena Ines Simac Carlo Wix

in: Centre for Economic Policy Research Discussion Papers, Nr. 15764, 2021

Abstract

We study how higher capital requirements introduced at the supranational and implemented at the national level affect the regulatory capital of banks across countries. Using the 2011 EBA capital exercise as a quasi-natural experiment, we find that affected banks inflate their levels of regulatory capital without a commensurate increase in their book equity and without a reduction in bank risk. This observed regulatory capital inflation is more pronounced in countries where credit supply is expected to tighten. Our results suggest that national authorities forbear their domestic banks to meet supranational requirements, with a focus on short-term economic considerations.

Publikation lesen

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The Cleansing Effect of Banking Crises

Reint E. Gropp Steven Ongena Jörg Rocholl Vahid Saadi

in: IWH Discussion Papers, Nr. 12, 2020

Abstract

We assess the cleansing effects of the recent banking crisis. In U.S. regions with higher levels of supervisory forbearance on distressed banks during the crisis, there is less restructuring in the real sector and the banking sector remains less healthy for several years after the crisis. Regions with less supervisory forbearance experience higher productivity growth after the crisis with more firm entries, job creation, and employment, wages, patents, and output growth. Supervisory forbearance is greater for state-chartered banks and in regions with weaker banking competition and more independent banks, while recapitalisation of distressed banks through TARP does not facilitate cleansing.

Publikation lesen

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The Cleansing Effect of Banking Crises

Reint E. Gropp Steven Ongena Jörg Rocholl Vahid Saadi

in: Centre for Economic Policy Research Discussion Papers, 2020

Abstract

We assess the cleansing effects of the recent banking crisis. In U.S. regions with higher levels of supervisory forbearance on distressed banks during the crisis, there is less restructuring in the real sector and the banking sector remains less healthy for several years after the crisis. Regions with less supervisory forbearance experience higher productivity growth after the crisis with more firm entries, job creation, and employment, wages, patents, and output growth. Supervisory forbearance is greater for state-chartered banks and in regions with weaker banking competition and more independent banks, while recapitalization of distressed banks through TARP does not facilitate cleansing.

Publikation lesen
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