Professor Dr. Sascha Steffen

Professor Dr. Sascha Steffen
Aktuelle Position

seit 11/14

Forschungsprofessor

Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH)

seit 8/17

Professor für Finanzen

Frankfurt School of Finance & Management

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Finanzintermediation
  • Banken

Sascha Steffen ist seit November 2014 Forschungsprofessor am IWH. Seine Forschungsinteressen liegen in den Bereichen Bankwesen, Unternehmensfinanzierung und Finanzintermediation.

Sascha Steffen ist Professor für Finanzen an der Frankfurt School of Finance & Management. Zuvor hatte er eine Professur für Finanzmärkte an der Universität Mannheim inne.

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Professor Dr. Sascha Steffen
Professor Dr. Sascha Steffen
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Publikationen

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A Capital Structure Channel of Monetary Policy

Benjamin Grosse-Rueschkamp Sascha Steffen Daniel Streitz

in: Journal of Financial Economics, Nr. 2, 2019

Abstract

We study the transmission channels from central banks’ quantitative easing programs via the banking sector when central banks start purchasing corporate bonds. We find evidence consistent with a “capital structure channel” of monetary policy. The announcement of central bank purchases reduces the bond yields of firms whose bonds are eligible for central bank purchases. These firms substitute bank term loans with bond debt, thereby relaxing banks’ lending constraints: banks with low tier-1 ratios and high nonperforming loans increase lending to private (and profitable) firms, which experience a growth in investment. The credit reallocation increases banks’ risk-taking in corporate credit.

Publikation lesen

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Mind the Gap: The Difference Between U.S. and European Loan Rates

Tobias Berg Anthony Saunders Sascha Steffen Daniel Streitz

in: Review of Financial Studies, Nr. 3, 2017

Abstract

We analyze pricing differences between U.S. and European syndicated loans over the 1992–2014 period. We explicitly distinguish credit lines from term loans. For credit lines, U.S. borrowers pay significantly higher spreads, but lower fees, resulting in similar total costs of borrowing in both markets. Credit line usage is more cyclical in the United States, which provides a rationale for the pricing structure difference. For term loans, we analyze the channels of the cross-country loan price differential and document the importance of: the composition of term loan borrowers and the loan supply by institutional investors and foreign banks.

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Arbeitspapiere

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Capital Misallocation and Innovation

Christian Schmidt Yannik Schneider Sascha Steffen Daniel Streitz

in: SSRN Solutions Research Paper Series, 2020

Abstract

This paper documents that "zombie" lending by undercapitalized banks distorts competition and impedes corporate innovation. This misallocation of capital prevents both the exit of zombie and entry of healthy firms in affected industries adversely impacting output and competition. Worse, capital misallocation depresses patent applications, particularly in high technology- and R&D-intensive sectors, and industries with neck- and-neck competition. We strengthen our results using an IV approach to address reverse causality and innovation survey data from the European Commission. Overall, our results are consistent with externalities imposed on healthy firms through the misallocation of capital.

Publikation lesen
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